Two checkpoints, but who’s checking?

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Wang Kelian has a population of only about 200 but there are two petrol stations there. ― Malay Mail pic

Wang Kelian has a population of only about 200 but there are two petrol stations there. ― Malay Mail pic

KANGAR, May 30 — One of the reasons for poor border control at the Malaysia-Thailand border in Wang Kelian is the nonchalant attitude of the authorities in charge of security there.

On Wednesday, photographer Azinuddin Ghazali, journalist S. Arulldas and I took a drive as we wanted to survey the border checkpoint.

The checkpoint is about 4km from Wang Kelian. Before reaching the border, there are two checkposts manned by Anti-Smuggling Unit officers.

Azinuddin asked me to pull over near the checkpost as he wanted to take some pictures of the officers — deemed the frontliners of the anti-smuggling unit — on duty.

He asked the officers if he could snap pictures of them going about their duties.

One of the officers asked Azinuddin what sort of pictures he wanted to take. Azinuddin, fondly known as Bob, replied: “Can you kindly check the cars passing through so that my pictures will be exciting.”

The officer replied: “That’s what we do.”

About seven cars passed and we realised the officer’s definition of checking was merely stopping the vehicles, looking at the drivers and then signalling with a wave of the hand for the drivers to continue their journey. Read more

Integrity body grilled for failing to curb custodial deaths

Source: The Malaysian Insider

Enforcement Agency Integrity Commission (EAIC) commissioner Leong May Chan speaks during a forum on police brutality at the Straits Trading Building in Kuala Lumpur. – The Malaysian Insider pic by Kamal Ariffin, May 30, 2015.

Enforcement Agency Integrity Commission (EAIC) commissioner Leong May Chan speaks during a forum on police brutality at the Straits Trading Building in Kuala Lumpur. – The Malaysian Insider pic by Kamal Ariffin, May 30, 2015.

Enforcement Agency Integrity Commission (EAIC) commissioner Leong May Chan found herself in the hot seat when many of those attending a forum on police accountability today hit out at the oversight body’s purported ineffectiveness in curbing custodial deaths.

Leong, who was part of a six-member panel at the forum, was questioned on EAIC’s effectiveness and its roles and powers by lawyers and members of the public.

Although she maintained her composure, the commissioner was at times caught unawares when questions were fired at her over how many complaints against the police were investigated and referred to the Attorney-General. Read more

Ex-CJ: Death in custody caused by cops’ disregard for human rights

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Ex-chief justice Tun Mohamed Dzaiddin Abdullah says death in custody happens where there is little focus on respecting the rule of law or the sanctity of human life. ― File pic

Ex-chief justice Tun Mohamed Dzaiddin Abdullah says death in custody happens where there is little focus on respecting the rule of law or the sanctity of human life. ― File pic

KUALA LUMPUR, May 30 — Deaths in custody were only possible because the police has turned a blind eye towards police violence, with disregard over human rights and weak self-accountability, former chief justice Tun Mohamed Dzaiddin Abdullah said today.

Dzaiddin, who had led the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Police Reform, said that this police culture has been instilled even starting at their training stage, where there is little focus on respecting the rule of law or the sanctity of human life.

“The current attitude within PDRM towards the rule of law is one of indifference, with a patent disregard for basic human rights,” Dzaiddin said today, using the Malay acronym for the Royal Malaysian Police.

“Whilst the current Malaysian Police Training Camp requisites a year-long course before graduation to constable, there is a distinct lack of emphasis upon respect for the rule of law or the sanctity of human life,” he said in his keynote address at a forum on police accountability. Read more

Who says police need report to probe into crime, asks ex-top cop

Source: The Malaysian Insider

Former federal Criminal Investigation Department director Tan Sri Zaman Khan says police are talking nonsense if they say someone has to lodge a report before they can investigate a crime. – The Malaysian Insider pic by Kamal Ariffin, May 30, 2015.

Former federal Criminal Investigation Department director Tan Sri Zaman Khan says police are talking nonsense if they say someone has to lodge a report before they can investigate a crime. – The Malaysian Insider pic by Kamal Ariffin, May 30, 2015.

Police can investigate a crime without a report being lodged, a retired senior officer said, dismissing the inspector-general of police’s contention that a probe can only be launched if a report is made.

Former federal Criminal Investigation Department director Tan Sri Zaman Khan said any police officer who said an investigation could only be launched if a report was lodged was talking “nonsense”.

“The police can investigate without a report, as long as the offence is an arrestable one,” he said at a forum on police accountability in the capital city of Kuala Lumpur today.

“If any police say they need a report to investigate a crime, that is nonsense.” Read more

Siapa kata perlu laporan polis siasat jenayah, soal Zaman Khan

Sumber: The Malaysian Insider

Bekas ketua Jabatan Siasatan Jenayah, Tan Sri Zaman Khan tidak bersetuju dengan pendirian Ketua Polis Negara Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar yang laporan polis perlu dibuat sebelum siasatan jenayah dilakukan. – Gambar The Malaysian Insider oleh Kamal Ariffin, 30 Mei, 2015.

Bekas ketua Jabatan Siasatan Jenayah, Tan Sri Zaman Khan tidak bersetuju dengan pendirian Ketua Polis Negara Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar yang laporan polis perlu dibuat sebelum siasatan jenayah dilakukan. – Gambar The Malaysian Insider oleh Kamal Ariffin, 30 Mei, 2015.

Polis Diraja Malaysia (PDRM) boleh menyiasat kes jenayah tanpa memerlukan laporan polis, kata bekas ketua Jabatan Siasatan Jenayah, Tan Sri Zaman Khan, menafikan kenyataan ketua polis negara yang siasatan hanya dilakukan apabila laporan dibuat.

Zaman berkata, mana-mana pegawai polis yang mengatakan siasatan hanya boleh dilakukan jika laporan polis dibuat adalah “tidak masuk akal”.

“Polis boleh menyiasat tanpa apa-apa laporan, selagi kesalahan itu boleh ditangkap,” katanya, pada sebuah forum akauntabiliti polis di Kuala Lumpur, hari ini.

“Jika polis kata perlukan laporan untuk siasat jenayah, itu tak masuk akal.” Read more

Ambiga demands international commission on Perlis mass graves

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Dato' Ambiga Sreenevasan - TMO file pic

Dato’ Ambiga Sreenevasan – TMO file pic

KUALA LUMPUR, May 30 — A commission comprising members of international bodies must be set up to investigate the mass graves discovered in Perlis last week as the situation has turned into a global problem, Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan said today.

The National Human Rights Society (Hakam) president also criticised the police for declaring that only two of 12 police officers arrested over the find were linked to the human trafficking camps, arguing that operations of that size would have involved many more people.

“We think the only announcement about the mass graves that is acceptable in a civilised society, if that’s we are, is that there will be an immediate commission set up consisting of members of international bodies.

Nothing less will be acceptable in a country like ours,” Ambiga said in a forum on police accountability here, co-organised by Hakam and the Malaysian Bar Council.

On Monday, Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar had announced the discovery of 139 graves in 28 camps of human trafficking syndicates between Kampung Wai in Kuala Perlis to Tangga 100 at Felda Lubuk Sireh, stretching over 11 kilometres.

The remains of four victims have been recovered so far from the site of the human trafficking camp.

The mentioned forum is the Forum on Rogue Cops: Workable Solutions – Police Accountability in Malaysia, a collaboration between the National Human Rights Society (HAKAM) and Bar Council Malaysia via its Task Force on IPCMC, which took place on 30 May 2015 in Kuala Lumpur.

 

Four years and 1,000 complaints later, EAIC says nobody prosecuted yet

Source: The Malay Mail Online

EAIC commissioner Leong May Chan speaks at a forum co-organised by the Malaysian Bar Council and the National Human Rights Society. ― Picture by Saw Siow Feng

EAIC commissioner Leong May Chan speaks at a forum co-organised by the Malaysian Bar Council and the National Human Rights Society. ― Picture by Saw Siow Feng

KUALA LUMPUR, May 30 — The Enforcement Agency Integrity Commission (EAIC) said today it has yet to refer to the Attorney-General’s Chambers (AGC) any of the over 1,000 complaints it has received since its inception in 2011, as none of them had any criminal elements.

Speaking at a forum on police accountability today, the oversight body said out of all the complaints, 60 per cent out of all the complaints were rejected for various reasons, and only over 200 cases merited full investigation.

“Why were they not referred to the public prosecutor? You see sometimes when we do the investigation, only if there are elements of criminal nature that we’ll refer to the public prosecutor,” EAIC commissioner Leong May Chan told the forum co-organised by the Malaysian Bar Council and the National Human Rights Society (Hakam).

“Please bear in mind that the agency was formed only four years ago … It’s a process,” Leong said.

Latest data on EAIC’s website showed that as at June this year, 1,088 complaints have been lodged with the EAIC, with 778 of them, or 72 per cent, being complaints against the police. Read more