Four years and 1,000 complaints later, EAIC says nobody prosecuted yet

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Source: The Malay Mail Online

EAIC commissioner Leong May Chan speaks at a forum co-organised by the Malaysian Bar Council and the National Human Rights Society. ― Picture by Saw Siow Feng

EAIC commissioner Leong May Chan speaks at a forum co-organised by the Malaysian Bar Council and the National Human Rights Society. ― Picture by Saw Siow Feng

KUALA LUMPUR, May 30 — The Enforcement Agency Integrity Commission (EAIC) said today it has yet to refer to the Attorney-General’s Chambers (AGC) any of the over 1,000 complaints it has received since its inception in 2011, as none of them had any criminal elements.

Speaking at a forum on police accountability today, the oversight body said out of all the complaints, 60 per cent out of all the complaints were rejected for various reasons, and only over 200 cases merited full investigation.

“Why were they not referred to the public prosecutor? You see sometimes when we do the investigation, only if there are elements of criminal nature that we’ll refer to the public prosecutor,” EAIC commissioner Leong May Chan told the forum co-organised by the Malaysian Bar Council and the National Human Rights Society (Hakam).

“Please bear in mind that the agency was formed only four years ago … It’s a process,” Leong said.

Latest data on EAIC’s website showed that as at June this year, 1,088 complaints have been lodged with the EAIC, with 778 of them, or 72 per cent, being complaints against the police.

The website also said that investigations have been completed on 101 cases, while another 122 probes are ongoing.

Out of those investigations, 86 per cent or 192 cases were against the police.

The states with the most complaints were Selangor followed by the Federal Territories.

The EAIC again reiterated its independence, explaining that it is answerable only to the Parliament, and its members were all appointed by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong.

Despite that, the commission admitted that it needs more “bite” to tackle its cases unlike the proposed Independent Police Complaints and Misconduct Commission (IPCMC) that can reprimand, dismiss and demote police officers.

The Malaysian Bar, civil society groups and several politicians from both sides of the divide have been calling for the IPCMC’s implementation since 2006 but to no avail.

There have been 242 cases of death in police custody between 2000 and 2014, with at least 13 cases alone last year, as reported by global watchdog Amnesty International.

– Leong was speaking at the Forum on Rogue Cops: Workable Solutions – Police Accountability in Malaysia, a collaboration between the National Human Rights Society (HAKAM) and Bar Council Malaysia via its Task Force on IPCMC, which took place on 30 May 2015 in Kuala Lumpur.