A-G applies to reopen custodial death inquest, 5 months after verdict

Source: The Malaysian Insider

Lawyer Eric Paulsen, who is representing the family of the deceased P. Karuna Nithi, says a deputy public prosecutor had written to Coroner Datuk Jagjit Singh to reopen the inquest. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, July 1, 2015.

Lawyer Eric Paulsen, who is representing the family of the deceased P. Karuna Nithi, says a deputy public prosecutor had written to Coroner Datuk Jagjit Singh to reopen the inquest. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, July 1, 2015.

The Attorney-General (A-G) has made an application to continue with an inquest to determine the cause of the death of an unemployed man who was detained at the Tampin district police headquarters in Negri Sembilan two years ago.

Lawyer Eric Paulsen, who represented the family of the deceased P. Karuna Nithi, said a deputy public prosecutor (DPP) had written to Coroner Datuk Jagjit Singh to reopen the inquest.

“The DPP who assisted the coroner in the inquest has indicated he would bring more witnesses,” Paulsen told The Malaysian Insider.

The matter has been fixed for mention in Seremban on Friday.

Paulsen said it was surprising for the DPP to reopen the case, five months after Jagjit had ruled that policemen and inmates were responsible for Karuna Nithi’s death. Read more

Report on the “Rogue Cops: Workable Solutions – Police Accountability in Malaysia” Forum – Thulsi Manogaran

BY THULSI MANOGARAN

Police Accountability

Police Accountability

 

On 30 May 2015, the Malaysian Bar Council Task Force on the IPCMC and HAKAM jointly organised a forum entitled “Rogue Cops: Workable Solutions – Police Accountability in Malaysia”. The forum was held at the Raja Aziz Auditorium in Kuala Lumpur. HAKAM and the Malaysian Bar saw it fit to resuscitate the findings of the Royal Commission of Inquiry (RCI) on the Police. One of the major proposals made by the commission is for the establishment of the Independent Police Complaints and Misconduct Commission (IPCMC).

Basic rights of the Malaysian people and foreigners have been trampled upon far too many times by the very people who are entrusted to care for our rights. This is not merely an allegation built on prejudice or bias against the police force. While society recognises that not all cops are rogue cops, this is not a trivial personalised battle. It has evolved into a systemic problem plaguing the entire force.

Even expert bodies have relented the same. The Human Rights Watch quoted in their report titled “No Answers, No Apologies” that “Human Rights Watch research found problems much more significant than mistakes or a few ineffectual officers. The serious rights abuses documented in this report point instead to structural problems that need to be addressed. Without rigorous investigation of alleged police abuse cases, those problems cannot be properly identified or tracked. Despite increasing public backlash, neither police leaders nor the civilian authorities who oversee their actions have made a genuine commitment to bringing about needed reform in police policy and practice. Read more