Home Ministry bans yellow clothing, ‘Bersih 4’ words

Source: The Malaysian Insider

A screengrab of the government gazette banning yellow clothing, as well as clothes with the words 'Bersih 4,' and also printed material connected to the rally that is set to take place tomorrow and Sunday in Kuala Lumpur and other cities. – August 28, 2015.

A screengrab of the government gazette banning yellow clothing, as well as clothes with the words ‘Bersih 4,’ and also printed material connected to the rally that is set to take place tomorrow and Sunday in Kuala Lumpur and other cities. – August 28, 2015.

Home Minister Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi has banned the use of yellow with the words Bersih 4 in whatever form ahead of the rally in three Malaysian cities tomorrow.

A government gazette signed by the minister yesterday and which came into effect today states that the order was made under the Printing, Presses and Publications Act 1984.

The Printing Presses and Publications (Control of Undesirable Publications) (No. 22) Order 2015 lists as “absolutely prohibited throughout Malaysia” the following items:

“Any yellow coloured clothing and which contains the words ‘Bersih 4′” and “Any other printed material and pamphlet which leads to Bersih 4 rally”.

A copy of the order in a Federal Government Gazette is available online. It was dated August 27 and comes into force today. Read more

Stop misusing Section 124B, Malaysian Bar tells cops after #OccupyParliament clampdown

Source: The Malay Mail Online

President of the Malaysian Bar Steven Thiru - Picture by MMO/Saw Siow Feng

President of the Malaysian Bar Steven Thiru – Picture by MMO/Saw Siow Feng

KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 28 — The Malaysian Bar questioned today the constitutionality of a Penal Code law governing parliamentary democracy after taking issue with what it said was an abuse of the provision by local enforcers.

In a statement, Bar Council president Steven Thiru cited the case of the arrest and subsequent remand earlier this week of 16 student participants of the #OccupyParliament sit-in protest, and said the police had erred when they applied to have the youths placed in lock-up for seven days.

“The duration sought was excessive, and lends to the widely held perception that the police are freely seeking remand orders to punish persons involved in peaceful assemblies, even before any finding of guilt by a court of law, as well as to further intimidate others who may wish to participate in any public assembly,” Steven said.

“The Malaysian Bar strongly urges the police to cease misusing Section 124B, and to respect the right of all Malaysians to assemble peaceably.

“Democracy is strengthened — not threatened — when Malaysians who wish to assemble in peace may do so without threats of reprisal or unjustified arrest,” he added. Read more