Most Malaysians feel unsafe in country, says UN report

Source: The Malay Mail Online

The UN 2015 Human Development Report showed that only 48 per cent of respondents feel safe in their own country. — Picture by Choo Choy May

The UN 2015 Human Development Report showed that only 48 per cent of respondents feel safe in their own country. — Picture by Choo Choy May

KUALA LUMPUR, Dec 17 — Less than half of Malaysians feel safe inside their own country, according to a United Nations (UN) report released this week that cited a Gallup poll.

The UN 2015 Human Development Report showed that only 48 per cent of respondents said “yes” last year to the Gallup World Poll question: “Do you feel safe walking alone at night in the city or area where you live?”

But the UN report also cited other data from the US research firm in the UN’s survey on perceptions of well-being, noting that in 2014, 63 per cent trusted the national government and just slightly more than half, 57 per cent, had confidence in the judicial system.

Malaysians also gave a six out of 10 score on the overall life satisfaction index, with 10 being the most satisfied.

Malaysia was ranked 62nd out of 188 countries in the UN’s Human Development Index that measured human development, categorised as a long and healthy life, knowledge and a decent standard of living, far below Singapore that ranked 11th.

At last, a climate deal – Gurdial Singh Nijar

Source: The Sundaily

BY GURDIAL SINGH NIJAR
(Deputy President, HAKAM)

PERHAPS the newly-minted climate change agreement may immortalise Paris as the Humphrey Bogart movie did Casablanca. This city of love delivered where Copenhagen and others failed.

Last Saturday, after two weeks of intense and often rancorous overnight negotiations, the French Presidency overseeing the negotiations at the 21st meeting of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), gavelled the Paris Agreement.

It was four years in the making since the 2011 Durban mandate to develop a legally binding document. It could not have come any earlier. Read more

Perbicaraan kes hasutan Azmi Sharom tangguh 8 Januari

Sumber: The Malaysian Insider

Kes profesor undang-undang Azmi Sharom ditangguhkan ke tahun depan kerana peguamnya Gobind Singh Deo, mempunyai urusan di mahkamah lain di Putrajaya hari ini. – Gambar fail The Malaysian Insider, 17 Disember, 2015.

Kes profesor undang-undang Azmi Sharom ditangguhkan ke tahun depan kerana peguamnya Gobind Singh Deo, mempunyai urusan di mahkamah lain di Putrajaya hari ini. – Gambar fail The Malaysian Insider, 17 Disember, 2015.

Prosiding perbicaraan kes profesor undang-undang Dr Azmi Sharom di bawah Akta Hasutan 1948 ditangguhkan ke 8 Januari tahun depan.

Hakim Mahkamah Sesyen Kuala Lumpur Amernuddin Ahmad membenarkan penangguhan itu hari ini, susulan permohonan dibuat peguam Azmi, Joanne Chua.

Chua memohon kes itu ditangguhkan kerana peguam Azmi yang mengendalikan kes itu, Gobind Singh Deo, mempunyai urusan di mahkamah lain di Putrajaya hari ini.

Semalam, Amernuddin menolak permohonan Gobind pada Selasa, supaya perbicaraan kes hasutannya dipindahkan ke Mahkamah Tinggi.

Gobind sebelum ini berkata, kes Azmi yang diputuskan Mahkamah Persekutuan pada 6 Oktober, 2015 sebagai selaras dengan Perlembagaan, akan mempunyai percanggahan dengan satu lagi kes di bawah akta sama iaitu kes Melan Abdullah melawan pendakwa raya. Read more

Sexual violence won’t end until states plug ‘gaping’ legal hole, says expert

Source: The Guardian

Former UN special rapporteur on violence against women calls for binding international treaty to hold governments to account and lend resolutions bite

 Former UN special rapporteur Rashida Manjoo believes efforts to end violence against women should focus on state accountability. Photograph: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images

Former UN special rapporteur Rashida Manjoo believes efforts to end violence against women should focus on state accountability. Photograph: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images

A “gaping hole” in international law is allowing governments to ignore their commitments to end gender-based violence, according to the former UN special rapporteur on the causes and consequences of violence against women.

Rashida Manjoo said states are not held fully accountable for ending violence because there is not an international treaty compelling them to do so. Manjoo called for a binding framework within the UN systemto tackle what she called a pervasive human rights violation.

A professor in the department of public law at the University of Cape Town in her native South Africa, Manjoo was appointed special rapporteur in 2009. Her tenure ended in July, and her parting shot was a report to the UN Human Rights Council that reiterated the case for establishing a legal instrument to hold governments accountable at international level. In October last year, she told the UN general assembly that the lack of a legally binding agreement was a major obstacle in achieving gender equality.

“UN entities continue to pass resolutions, but they are not legally binding … we talk about the universality of human rights, when there’s a gaping hole. We need to focus on state accountability,” she told an event on ending violence against women in London last week, hosted by the Guardian and ActionAid. Read more

Ministry says may examine need for husbands’ consent in women’s sterilisation

Source: The Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, Dec 17 ― The Women, Family and Community Development Ministry could look into the practice of requiring women to obtain their husbands’ consent for certain reproductive procedures if more women express disagreement.

Datuk Seri Rohani Karim today conceded that she was not familiar with the issue, but said that needing wives to produce their husbands’ consent for tubal ligation procedures was the “norm.”

The same requirement is not imposed on men obtaining vasectomies.

“The natural process is that there is discussion because this means they don’t want kids anymore.

“Because I’m not very aware but all along it’s not being brought up… But maybe we’ll look into it if the women want us to look into it,” she said during a press conference at the Putra World Trade Centre today. Read more

NSC Bill about power, not security, interfaith group says

Source: The Malay Mail Online

The NSC Bill is currently awaiting approval by the Dewan Negara. — MMO file pic

The NSC Bill is currently awaiting approval by the Dewan Negara. — MMO file pic

KUALA LUMPUR, Dec 17 — The absence of a tangible security policy to accompany the National Security Council Bill 2015 belies the government’s insistence that the proposed law was meant to safeguard the country’s safety, said an interfaith group today.

The Malaysian Consultative Council on Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Sikhism and Taoism (MCCBCHST) pointed out that despite national security being the main thrust of the Bill, the proposed law does not attempt to communicate how the powers will be used to safeguard the country’s safety.

The umbrella body for the country’s non-Muslim religions also echoed concerns by other critics who said the Bill would usurp authority of the Yang di-Pertuan Agong to declare a state of emergency and transfer this to the National Security Council headed by the prime minister.

“A further objection to the NSC Bill is that it has over-focussed on empowering the prime minister and the drafters of the Bill appear to have completely forgotten to require the NSC to produce a National Security Policy.

“It is understood that the Malaysian government has not produced any document on National Security Policy until today,” the group said in a statement. Read more