Section 233(1)(a) of the Communications and Multimedia Act 1998 Creates a Chilling Effect on Freedom of Speech and Expression, and Should be Repealed – Steven Thiru

Press Release

Section 233(1)(a) of the Communications and Multimedia Act 1998
Creates a Chilling Effect
on Freedom of Speech and Expression, and Should be Repealed

The Malaysian Bar is deeply concerned over the use of Section 233(1)(a) of the Communications and Multimedia Act 1998 (“CMA”) which, among others, criminalises the use of network facilities or network services by a person to transmit any communication that is deemed to be offensive and could cause annoyance to another person.

Section 233(3) of the CMA stipulates, upon conviction, the imposition of a maximum fine of RM50,000 or a maximum one-year jail term or both, as well as a further fine of RM1,000 for every day the offence is continued after conviction. Read more

Mahkamah putuskan penahanan, pendakwaan Kassim Ahmad tidak sah

Sumber: The Malaysian Insider

Tangkapan dan penahanan intelektual dan aktivis Islam Dr Kassim Ahmad yang dilakukan Jabatan Agama Islam Wilayah Persekutuan pada 2013 adalah tidak sah, putus Mahkamah Rayuan hari ini. – Gambar fail The Malaysian Insider, 21 Disember, 2015.

Tangkapan dan penahanan intelektual dan aktivis Islam Dr Kassim Ahmad yang dilakukan Jabatan Agama Islam Wilayah Persekutuan  (Jawi) pada 2013 adalah tidak sah, putus Mahkamah Rayuan hari ini.

Panel 3 orang hakim diketuai Vernon Ong Lam Kiat berkata, Jawi tidak mempunyai bidang kuasa terhadap Kassim yang menetap di Kedah.

“Kami mengarahkan penangkapan, penahanan dan pendakwaan terbatal dan kes dibuang,” katanya dalam membenarkan rayuan Kassim menentang keputusan Mahkamah Tinggi.

Panel hakim juga membenarkan hujah Mahkamah Tinggi Sivil mempunyai bidang kuasa yang lebih tinggi berbanding tribunal yang lebih rendah, termasuk Mahkamah Syariah dalam soal perundangan. Read more

Homeless people are not cockroaches or vermin, they are human and have rights – Leilani Farha

Source: The Guardian

The most glaring violation of human rights is at a doorstep near you. The global stigma surrounding homeless people sees them treated like illegally parked cars

All over the world, homeless people are subject to criminal sanction, given tickets or forced out of city centres just for sleeping or eating. Photograph: Vadim Ghirda/AP

How is it that homelessness – one of the most egregious violations of human rights globally – can be so invisible?

The answer lies in the fact that we have done pretty much everything we can to erase homeless people from our sight and from our minds.

How governments, the media, and the affluent treat homeless people has a significant impact on how the rest of us view them and, ultimately, how homeless people view themselves. They have become a social group that, if not ignored completely, is faced with relentless vilification, discrimination, criminalisation and even hate crimes.

In many countries, homeless people who are engaged in the simple acts of eating and sleeping in the only spaces available to them – parks, public squares, or vacant lands – are subject to criminal sanction, given tickets (like illegally parked cars), and forcibly removed from city centres (also like illegally parked cars). Left to languish like garbage in a landfill on the periphery of society, they are rendered completely invisible. While this may be the preferred approach for some governments, it only cements stigmatisation and helps internalise discrimination against those who are homeless. Read more

Malaysia’s free thought, religious expression under ‘serious assault’, study shows

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Visit freethoughtreport.com/map to get the hi-res download or use the interactive map – image taken from IHEU website

KUALA LUMPUR, Dec 21 ― Freedom of thought, religious expression and dissent in Malaysia are facing “grave violations”, according to the latest global study by the the International Humanist and Ethical Union (IHEU).

The group’s annual Freedom of Thought Report 2015 released earlier this month noted the “serious assaults” to Malaysia’s freedoms of expression, in particular those concerning religious views.

“This country is found to be declining, with human rights including freedom of thought and expression under serious assault… ‘blasphemy’ is outlawed or criticism of religion is restricted and punishable with a prison sentence,” the report said. Read more