Malaysia outlaws ‘fake news’; sets jail of up to six years

Source: Reuters

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) – Malaysia on Monday approved a law against “fake news” that would allow for prison of up to six years for offenders, shrugging off critics who say it was aimed at curbing dissent and free speech ahead of a general election.

A commuter walks past an advertisement discouraging the dissemination of fake news at a train station in downtown Kuala Lumpur March 26, 2018. — Picture by Hari Anggara

Prime Minister Najib Razak’s government secured a simple majority in parliament to pass the Anti-Fake News 2018 bill, which sets out fines of up to 500,000 ringgit ($123,000) and a maximum six years in jail. The first draft of the bill had proposed jail of up to 10 years. Read more

Protest organisers meet with police

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Police had visited Bersih 2.0’s office in Petaling Jaya last week to interview the group, but later agreed to let the activists provide the statements today. ― Picture courtesy of Bersih 2.0

KUALA LUMPUR, April 2 — Five activist believed to have organised a protest outside Parliament last week went to the Dang Wangi police station today to give their statements for an investigation into their alleged violation of an assembly law.

The group included Bersih 2.0 director Yap Swee Seng, secretariat member Mandeep Singh, acting chairman Shahrul Aman Mohd Shaari, Suaram executive director Sevan Doraisamy and project coordinator Amir And Hadi.

Police had visited Bersih 2.0’s office in Petaling Jaya last week to interview the group, but later agreed to let the activists provide the statements today. Read more

Apex court defers hearing for five Malaysia-born stateless persons… again

Source: The Malay Mail Online

The Palace of Justice in Putrajaya – File pix

PUTRAJAYA, April 2 — The Federal Court today again rescheduled its hearing involving the cases of five stateless individuals who were born in Malaysia and want to be recognised as Malaysian citizens.

Hearing for the five cases had been previously postponed to today, but when their cases were called this morning, the Federal Court asked the lawyers to come up with a common set of questions of law for all five cases.

Court of Appeal president Tan Sri Zulkefli Ahmad Makinudin, who chaired the five-judge panel, asked the lawyers if it was possible for all five cases to be heard together due to the varying facts of some of the cases.

He noted that the individuals in the cases range from children adopted by Malaysians to children born to a foreigner mother, and also related to issues on a child’s legitimacy. Read more