No signs of abuse, but cops accused of negligence in Thanabalan’s death

Source: Free Malaysia Today

Thanabalan Subramaniam, 38, was arrested late last month outside a school in Kapar, died in custody 20 days later. His family was told that he died of a heart attack. Image from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: The post-mortem on Thanabalan Subramaniam, who died in police custody, could not confirm the cause of death but there were no signs that he was subject to any physical abuse, says incumbent Kapar MP G Manivannan.

Speaking to FMT, Manivannan said tissue and blood samples had been taken for further analysis to determine the cause of death.

Yesterday, Selangor police said they suspected that the centralised lock-up where the 38-year-old Thanabalan was being held had been contaminated by an infection.

“However, I believe there is an element of medical negligence on the part of the police as they should have ensured that Thanabalan received medical attention quickly,” Manivannan said.

Thanabalan, who was allegedly detained under the Security Offences (Special Measures) Act, or Sosma, died at Hospital Shah Alam on Tuesday after being rushed there from the Shah Alam police headquarters where he had been held for some 20 days.

His death led to questions by civil society groups on the police’s commitment to putting an end to custodial deaths. Read more

‘Be My Protector’: Launch of new anti-human trafficking app

Source: TheSunDaily

The launch of the 1st anti-human trafficking app ‘Be My Protector’ here in the CO3 Social Office in Puchong on April 19, 2018. — Sunpix by Zulfadhli Zaki

PETALING JAYA: The fight against human trafficking in the country could be intensified following the launch of the first ever anti-human trafficking mobile application in Southeast Asia.

The app, aptly named “Be My Protector”, is the brainchild of human rights organisations Tenaganita and Change Your World (CYW), and required two years of development leading up to its release.

Describing the launch as a historical moment, Tenaganita director Aegile Fernandez said the app was necessary to allow the public and the victims themselves to have a proper channel to report cases of human trafficking.

“We have enforcement, but that is a different level. That’s when the idea of the app came about. It took us two years of sitting down, brainstorming and testing.

“We could not let the matter just go. I always question why are we the losers in this war against human trafficking? We should be the winners, and today this dream has become a reality,” she said at the launch, here today. Read more