What lies ahead for a stateless child in Malaysia?

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Stateless children in Malaysia have many different circumstances. Some are abandoned at birth, others are adopted but cannot trace their birth parents, and more are born to a foreign mother who did not register their marriage to their Malaysian spouse. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa for the MMO.

Stateless children in Malaysia have many different circumstances. Some are abandoned at birth, others are adopted but cannot trace their birth parents, and more are born to a foreign mother who did not register their marriage to their Malaysian spouse. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa for the MMO.

KUALA LUMPUR, March 20 — Children who are born in Malaysia but fail to get citizenship are thrown into a complex bureaucratic and legal mess, leaving them with an uncertain future that can appear hopeless.

Stateless children in Malaysia have many different circumstances. Some are abandoned at birth, others are adopted but cannot trace their birth parents, and more are born to a foreign mother who did not register their marriage to their Malaysian spouse.

Whatever their scenario, however, these children face an arduous road ahead.

While going to the courts is the most conventional way of challenging the National Registration Department’s refusal to recognise a Malaysia-born child as citizen, failure here sets the child up for a life of uncertainty. Read more

Association to seek meeting with ministry on citizenship issues

Source: The Borneo Post Online

KOTA KINABALU, 18 August 2016: Despite scoring 4As in the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia (SPM), Jerwin Chong Yie, 18, was denied further education in Form 6 because he does not have an identity card.

Jerwin was born to a Malaysian father Chong Vui Hsung, 50, and Filipino mother Jennifer Loping Sausa, 52.

However, Chong and Jennifer only registered their marriage a month after their son was born.

Under such circumstances, the status of the mother determines the status of the child.

Without identification card and Malaysian citizenship, Jerwin was rejected when he tried to apply into Form 6.

“When my son was 12, I took him to apply for an identification card.

“I was told that I must change his birth certificate to a new one in order to apply for the identification card.

“But when the new birth certificate was issued, we still cannot apply for the identification card.

“The National Registration Department (NRD) said the status of my son could only follow that of his mother’s.” Read more

End the misery of stateless children – Goh Siu Lin

Source: FMT News

BY GOH SIU LIN

Federal Government should make decisions within six months as recommended by Court of Appeal.

navin

The Association of Women Lawyers refers to the news report on the long-awaited decision of the Home Ministry in granting citizenship to Navin Moorthy under Article 15 of the Federal Constitution.

This is indeed a significant moment for child rights in Malaysia, in line with the spirit and intent of the said Article 15A while upholding Malaysia’s obligations under Article 7 the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child on the right of every child to acquire a nationality.

M. Navin was born in this country to a Malaysian father and Filipino mother. He had endured a 3 year legal battle seeking Malaysian citizenship after his father’s two earlier applications to the Home Ministry for his son’s Malaysian citizenship were consecutively rejected in 2011 and 2012. Read more

Another case of citizenship denied?

Source: Daily Express

Pic taken from Daily Express.

Kota Kinabalu: Barely a fortnight after publicising a similar case – but without getting any response from the State NRD Director despite attempts by Daily Express – a Tenom-born woman claims to have also been denied her right to Malaysian citizenship.

She was only given a MyPR (Permanent Resident status) card, according to the Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam), Sabah Office, who referred the matter to Daily Express. Read more

After 17 years, stateless teen finally recognised as Malaysian

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Navin Moorthy who received his citizenship certificate yesterday, shows his temporary IC document in Putrajaya, April 6, 2016. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

Navin Moorthy who received his citizenship certificate yesterday, shows his temporary IC document in Putrajaya, April 6, 2016. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

PUTRAJAYA, April 6 ― Teenager Navin Moorthy finally received official recognition of his citizenship today, 17 years after he was born in Malaysia.

Navin, who has about three months before his 18th birthday, yesterday received a Citizenship Certificate issued under Article 15 of the Federal Constitution.

“I’m more than happy I got it,” said the teenager who was born to a Malaysian father and Filipino mother.

Navin, who has been given a temporary identification document until he officially receives his identity card, said he was unable to say what he wanted to do first as a Malaysian citizen. Read more