Removing top ‘normal procedure’, says airline

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Malindo has two uniforms — a high-collared white blouse or a white kebaya top paired with a sarong. — AFP pic.

Malindo has two uniforms — a high-collared white blouse or a white kebaya top paired with a sarong. — AFP pic.

PETALING JAYA, April 5 — It is the right of the employer to request potential flight attendants to expose their chests to interviewers, said Malindo Air public relations and communications director Raja Sa’adi Raja Amrin.

The requirement to remove their tops, but with bras on, was to see if applicants had visible marks due to the material of Malindo’s uniform.

Raja Sa’adi said such checks were necessary as their uniforms were “partially see-throughs”.

“It is not an issue. We have the right to conduct such body checks on them. I think most airlines do the same,” he said.

“We need to see if they (applicants) have scars, pimples or tattoos that could be seen through the uniform. Our flight attendants wear a corset inside and if it is covered by the corset, it is okay.” Read more

Women’s Aid Organisation (WAO) Gender Equality Talks #3 — Respect My Bump: Pregnancy Discrimination

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Women’s Aid Organisation (WAO) is hosting a series of four gender equality talks in conjunction with the worldwide 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign.

Did you know that 40% of pregnant women have been discriminated at work?

Learn how we can create inclusive workplaces for women. Noorfadilla Ahmad Saikin will also share her experience advocating for pregnant women’s rights.

Free & open to public.

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With child, without job: Pregnant Malaysian women and workplace discrimination

Source: NST Online

DISCRIMINATION: Being pregnant should be the happiest time in a woman’s life. Unfortunately, many have to choose between family and career, because having a bun in the oven could get you passed over for a promotion, sidelined or even fired. While mothers and wives continue to help out with the family finances and fulfil their household duties, most are still getting the short end of the stick, writes Audrey Vijaindren.

FINDING their positions redundant, being denied promotions, being placed on prolonged probation, demotion and even getting sacked — these are among the unenviable positions many Malaysian women have found themselves in, especially when they are with child.

Shocking as it may seem in this day and age, a recent Workplace Discrimination Survey by the Women’s Aid Organisation (WAO) revealed that more than 40 per cent of women polled have experienced job discrimination due to their pregnancy.

The online survey of 222 women polled from across the country revealed that the top five ways employers discriminated against pregnant women were by making their positions redundant, denying them promotions, placing them on prolonged probation, demoting them, and firing them.

WAO launched the survey to promote respect, protection and equal rights for women in the workplace, specifically for pregnant mothers. Read more

Bumped off the career path

Source: NST Online

File pic — AFP

File pic — AFP

WOMEN still face challenges and unfair treatment at the workplace when they become pregnant, according to a recent survey by the Women’s Aid Organisation (WAO).

The online poll, called the Workplace Discrimination Survey, polled 222 women from across the country to shed light on workplace discrimination against pregnant women.

More than 40 per cent of those polled admitted to having experienced job discrimination due to their pregnancy. The survey also revealed the top five ways employers discriminated against pregnant women. These included measures such as making their positions redundant, denying them promotions, placing them on prolonged probation, demoting them and terminating their jobs.

WAO launched the survey to promote respect, protection and equal rights for women in the workplace, specifically for pregnant women.

A woman should be free to choose if and when to have children says Sumitra Visvanathan, executive director of WAO. Read more

Closing the gaps in the law — Joint Action Group for Gender Equality

Source: The Malay Mail Online

AUG 26 — On Hari Wanita, the Joint Action Group for Gender Equality (JAG) urges the Malaysian government to close the gaps in our domestic laws that obstruct the elimination of violence against women and girls and the achievement of gender equality in our country, which remain yet unrealized goals.

Even after years of civil society expending critical resources in educating and engaging with policymakers, words have not materialised into concrete actions, and women and girls are still regularly subjected to violence and discrimination, with limited recourse in the law. It is time for all MPs to demonstrate their commitment to eliminating the gender gap and bringing about equality in our society by supporting the law reform initiatives that JAG has been lobbying for consistently over the past decade. Read more

Dark days for the fairer sex – Zainah Anwar

Source: The Star Online

Malaysia used to have one of the most progressive Muslim family laws in the world but by 2003, we are right there at the bottom, thanks to amendments to the law which discriminated women.

Far from equal: Egyptian women displaying their ink-stained fingers after casting their ballot at a polling station in Egypt recently. Egypt is listed in the UN Report on Progress of the World’s Women, along with Malaysia, for having highly discriminatory family laws. — AFP

Far from equal: Egyptian women displaying their ink-stained fingers after casting their ballot at a polling station in Egypt recently. Egypt is listed in the UN Report on Progress of the World’s Women, along with Malaysia, for having highly discriminatory family laws. — AFP

IN the latest UN report on Progress of the World’s Women 2015-2016, Malaysia is ignominiously lumped with Algeria, Bangladesh, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, as countries that have maintained highly discriminatory family laws.

It is not that all these worst countries have laws based on Islam, for there are many Muslim countries with far better family laws. The significant finding is that women’s groups face the biggest resistance to reform when state and religion are closely intertwined. In such countries, religious doctrine is less likely to evolve and adapt to changing social practices as patriarchal interpretations of religion get frozen.

In contrast, the report highlighted the achievement of Morocco where the women’s movement mobilisation for family law reform, the election of a socialist party into power and the ascendance of a young progressive King successfully led to an overhaul of its Muslim family law.

The law reform in 2004, based on Islamic and human rights principles and women’s lived realities, recognise marriage as a partnership of equals. Read more