Govt bodies wrap up one more scandalous year

Source: The Malaysian Insight 

The Malaysian Insight

Allegations of dodgy land and property purchases, as well as fraud and theft of public funds kept Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission busy in 2017. – The Malaysian Insight file pic, January 1, 2018.

IN 2016, Malaysians were variously entertained and provoked by one exposé after another on state investor 1Malaysia Development Bhd (1MDB).

The scandals did not let up in 2017, as Malaysians were treated to a buffet of revelations of fraud, power abuse and impropriety involving a greater range of statutory bodies and agencies.

Malaysians were informed of alleged wrongdoings in Felda and Mara, both of which lost millions of ringgit because of mismanagement, bad business decisions, corruption, and power abuse.

Graft-busters were kept busy investigating allegations of dodgy land and property purchases, as well as fraud and theft of public funds.

Below is a compilation of the scandals that broke last year, some of which are still developing as investigations continue.  Read more

Labuan’s poor economy due to waste, rampant corruption, says PKR

Source: Free Malaysia Today

Free Malaysia Today

Labuan PKR chief Simsudin Sidek says official figures on poverty do not reflect real situation on ground.

KOTA KINABALU: The expanding rich-poor gap among the people in Labuan is due to the current government’s system that encourages resource leakage, wastage, corruption and unbridled cronyism, claims PKR.

Labuan PKR chief Simsudin Sidek said the situation worsened when the government decided to implement the goods and services tax (GST) which caused prices of consumer goods to rise suddenly.

Simsudin said it was maddening that the government continued to claim that the country was almost free of poverty when in Sabah, Sarawak and Labuan, the poverty rate was still high.

In truth, he said, the government had still failed to address inequality and poverty in these states.

He said Sabahans, Sarawakians and Labuanites were marginalised although the nation had rapidly developed and, by right, every citizen should be able to enjoy the country’s wealth.  Read more

Public Forum: Supporting the MACC in fighting corruption in Malaysia

The Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission in recent times has had phenomenal success in uncovering large corruption scandals which include the arrests of several high profile government officials. Given their good work, it is important that civil society and the public rally together in support of the MACC.

On 26 January 2017, the Institute for Democracy and Economic Affairs (IDEAS) will be organising a public forum titled “Supporting the MACC in fighting corruption in Malaysia” at the Royal Lake Club, Kuala Lumpur, 9.30 am to 12.30 pm.

This public forum is part of IDEAS’ on-going nationwide campaign #Nyahkorupsi which advocates institutional reforms to combat corruption and promote good governance. The public forum will discuss how the public and the civil society alike can support the MACC in its fight against corruption. We will also launch a signature drive to end corruption in Malaysia.

Speakers include:

  • Cynthia Gabriel, Centre for Combatting Corruption and Cronyism (C4)
  • Dato’ Akhbar Satar, Transparency International Malaysia
  • Jeffrey Phang, Friends of Kota Damansara
  • Wan Saiful Wan Jan, IDEAS
  • Khairil Yusoff, Sinar Project

Join the fight against corruption today! Register at https://supportingmacc.eventbrite.com/

 

MACC: Having one too many Hermes, Chanel or Louis Vuitton bags will raise eyebrows

Source: The Malay Mail Online

According to a report, MACC deputy chief commissioner for operations Datuk Azam Baki confirmed that his men monitored postings by civil servants who depicted a lavish lifestyle.

A model carries a Hermes signature Birkin with Himalayan crocodile leather and diamonds, sold for $300,168 at a Christie's auction on May 30, 2016 which becomes the world's most expensive handbag, at a preview in Hong Kong, China May 4, 2016. REUTERS

A model carries a Hermes signature Birkin with Himalayan crocodile leather and diamonds, sold for $300,168 at a Christie’s auction on May 30, 2016 which becomes the world’s most expensive handbag, at a preview in Hong Kong, China May 4, 2016. REUTERS

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 6 — The Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) is now monitoring photographs of civil servants and their families posted on Facebook and Instagram to ensure their lifestyles match their earnings.

According to a report by The Star newspaper, posts of foreign holidays and those of expensive, luxury items will lead to further scrutiny to determine if the posters were involved in corrupt practises.

The MACC source declined to comment, however, when asked if such monitoring has led to any prosecutions.

“We do look into it. We can consider them as initial information to carry out further checks. If it warrants an investigation, then we will probe.

“We cannot check all postings, but mostly the public does send them to us and it is taken as a first information,” the person was quoted as saying.

In the news report, MACC deputy chief commissioner for operations Datuk Azam Baki also confirmed that his men monitored postings by civil servants who depicted a lavish lifestyle.

“We also rely on our public tip offs and our own intelligence gathering to investigate such cases,” he was quoted as saying.

Saying there was nothing inherently wrong with civil servants owning luxury items, Azam noted, however, that suspicions may be aroused when an individual appeared to own an excess. Read more

Call to reform MACC gathers pace – Gurdial Singh Nijar

Source: The Sundaily

BY GURDIAL SINGH NIJAR
(Deputy President, HAKAM)

THE clamour for institutional reform has never been louder. From the ordinary layman who questions the false steps of some institutions – with mana boleh ini macam? – to the Bar Council’s measured assessments. All raise this as an urgent national agenda.

Even the MACC deputy chief commissioner (prevention), Datuk Seri Mustafar Ali, says that to “ensure our complete independence” the appointment of the chief commissioner should not just be provided for under the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission Act 2009, but instead be a constitutionally-appointed position like judges.

The Save Malaysia campaign has made this one of its key demands. Hakam, the premier National Human Rights body, headed by former Bar Council chief Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan, speaks of the “dire need for institutional reform“.

Nobody denies that the bane of a country – corruption – must be curbed. Else the country may be on a roller-coaster to a dismal economic and governance future. Malaysia is a party to the UN Convention Against Corruption since 2008 which obliges it to enact measures to implement several anti-corruption measures aimed at preventing corruption, including domestic and foreign bribery, embezzlement, trading in influence and money laundering. And to cooperate internationally to provide effective legal mechanisms for asset recovery, technical assistance and information exchange. Read more