What a Najib win could mean for Malaysia

Source: Free Malaysia Today

Free Malaysia Today

KUALA LUMPUR: The rule of the Umno-led Barisan Nasional looks set to be extended for many years to come if the Umno-PAS alignment works, according to an editorial in the East Asia Forum.

However, this portends ill for the non-Malay minorities and liberal Muslims, as Umno, increasingly dependent on PAS, dances to the latter’s tunes, it says.

The editorial of the East Asia Forum, which is based in the Australian National University’s Crawford School of Public Policy, says Najib Razak will almost certainly survive the 1MDB scandal unscathed if Umno’s understanding with PAS holds and its manoeuvring to drive a wedge between the opposition parties continues to succeed.

“Decades of institutional degeneration under Umno rule, and the concentration of power in the office of the prime minister, has seen Najib able to swat away any domestic attempts to hold him to account for his role in the 1MDB affair. The unfortunate importance of identity politics in shaping voter behaviour also helps insulate him from much of the electoral backlash.”  Read more

BN to consider upping quota for women senators if it wins big in GE14, says PM

Source: The Malaysian Insight

THE Barisan Nasional government will consider increasing the quota for women representatives in the Dewan Negara if it gets a strong mandate in the 14th general election, said Najib Razak.

Speaking at the Women in Politics Kuala Lumpur 2017 conference, the prime minister said the BN government must get the required vote majority if such changes were to be made.

“If we get the required majority in the next general election, we could impose a quota for the upper house, that it must comprise no less than 30% of women senators,” he said when officiating at the international conference, held in conjunction with this year’s Umno General Assembly. Read more

Vital to maintain integrity of polls — Gurdial Singh Nijar

Source: The Sun Daily

BY GURDIAL SINGH NIJAR
(Deputy President, HAKAM)

A SIGNIFICANT court decision was handed down last week in a country that, broadly speaking, shares a common heritage with Malaysia in terms of its system of laws based on a written constitution. I am referring to the Supreme Court of Kenya declaring the election of a president as fundamentally flawed.

The incumbent, Uhuru Kenyatta, was re-elected as president with 54% of the vote. His main challenger, a former prime minister, Raila Odinga, received 1.4 million votes less.

Odinga petitioned the court to nullify the election – alleging that seven million of his votes were “stolen”.

Read more

Malaysians must reject vengeful politicians and those who suggest threats of violence — Bersih Statement

Dated 20 April 2017

downloadBERSIH 2.0, the Coalition for Clean and Fair Elections, is appalled by the messages of intimidation and vengeance that a few top government leaders are sending out in the prelude to a general election that is expected to be held between the coming months and middle of next year.

First, is the thinly veiled, horrific warning by Deputy Prime Minister Zahid Hamidi that were the so-called social contract broken, Malaysians can expect not only “social disorder but – worse than that – our streets will be littered with blood and dead bodies”.

“Free Malaysia Today” quoted Zahid as saying this in his keynote address at the Human Ecology International Conference in Putrajaya on 18 April.

Then on 19 April, it was reported that Urban Well-being, Housing and Local Government Minister Noh Omar had issued a 6 March directive to local councils to scrap small-scale infrastructure projects in parliamentary constituencies not represented by the ruling party.

BERSIH 2.0 finds Zahid’s statement and Noh’s action deplorable, coming especially from political leaders who should be setting the tone for a free and fair general election to come. Read more

Zahid: Don’t sacrifice social contract with grab for power

Source: FMT News

Home minister warns of disorder with streets 'littered with blood and dead bodies' if Malaysia’s social contract is broken. Pic from FMT News.

Home minister warns of disorder with streets ‘littered with blood and dead bodies’ if Malaysia’s social contract is broken. Pic from FMT News.

PUTRAJAYA: Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi has reminded Malaysians not to sacrifice the nation’s “social contract” because of the desire to wrest power from the government.

The home minister today said Malaysia’s peace and harmony is possible because of this agreement that has bound the people from various races, religions and cultures together for many years.

“Today, that foundation is being challenged and has become very flimsy because there are people out there who want to grab power and have distorted the social contract with their deceptive propaganda,” he said, without naming anyone.

The Umno deputy president cited the Malay proverb “retak menunggu belah” (a crack waits to become a split), saying such a situation should not be allowed to happen.

“I must remind that if that social contract is broken, there will not (only) be social disorder but worse than that, our streets will be littered with blood and dead bodies,” he said. Read more

Bersih kicks off campaign to encourage voter registration

Source: FMT News

Bersih 2.0 staff and supporters campaigning to encourage more people to register as voters as part of a campaign to boost voter registration. The electoral watchdog also urges Election Commission once again to give them ARO status so they can help register eligible voters.

Bersih 2.0 staff and supporters encourage more people to register as voters as part of a campaign to boost voter registration. The electoral watchdog also urges Election Commission once again to give them ARO status so they can help register eligible voters. Pic taken from FMT News.

KUALA LUMPUR: Electoral watchdog Bersih 2.0 took to the ground to encourage more people to register as voters as part of a campaign to boost voter registration.

The nationwide campaign kicked off in several locations today including Kuala Lumpur, Pahang, Sabah and Kedah.

Former Bersih chairman Ambiga Sreenevasan campaigned at the Pudu Sentral entrance and even escorted those who wanted to register as voters to the nearest post office where she waited until they completed the registration process.

“We want as many people to register before the end of the month because we don’t know when the next general election (GE14) will be held.”

In Kuantan, Pahang, Bersih 2.0 chairperson Maria Chin Abdullah led the campaign at the Kuantan Urban Transformation Centre (UTC). The campaign was also held in Donggongon and Inanam, Sabah as well as Alor Setar, Kuala Kedah and Jitra in Kedah.

Ambiga said the campaign was aimed at showing people how quick and easy it was to register as a voter.

“Perhaps many feel it is a tedious process, but as we saw for ourselves, the registration process took under five minutes after a person’s queue ticket number was called.” Read more

[Cancelled] UndiMsiaChats #3: Electoral Reforms

Update on 28 Nov: We have received advice from the organiser that this event scheduled for tonight had been cancelled.


In mid-September, the Election Commission issued a notice that they would propose recommendations for a redelineation of constituency boundaries. How would the implementation of those recommendations influence Malaysia?

By organizing a series of #UndiMsia! chats, we want to find answers and unpack the issues of gerrymandering (Session 1), constituent delineation (Session 2) and discuss electoral reforms (Session 3).

Session 3 is on 28th November. More details will be announced shortly.

If you want to know more about the topic of electoral reforms, keep your calendars free.

Admission is free and open to everyone.

UndiMsiaChats #2: Constituent Delineation – fair electoral borders, equal representation?

In mid-September, the Election Commission issued a notice that they would propose recommendations for a redelineation of constituency boundaries. How would the implementation of those recommendations influence Malaysia?

By organizing a series of #UndiMsia! chats, we want to find answers and unpack the issues of gerrymandering (Session 1), constituent delineation (Session 2) and discuss electoral reforms (Session 3).

Come join us for our second #UndiMsia talk on constituency delineation, with a representative from Tindak Malaysia, an organisation working towards a fair electoral system.

Constituency delineation? What’s behind that?

It generally refers to the (re-) drawing of electoral boundaries. Delineation all sounds very technical, BUT it has a very practical impact on the future of Malaysia.

Re-delineation can have a significant impact of an election’s outcome. By re-delineating, the majorities in a constituency can be shifted. By making a constituency bigger or smaller, your vote may actually loose or gain value.

Join us and Tindak Malaysia to find out the current state of electoral boundaries and how they may shift in the near future. Have a fruitful discussion on the fairness of this process and whether Malaysia applies international standards.

UndiMsiaChats #1: How Gerry and Salamander won the election

In mid-September, the Election Commission issued a notice that they would propose recommendations for a redelineation of constituency boundaries. How would the implementation of those recommendations influence Malaysia?

By organizing a series of #UndiMsia! chats, we want to find answers and unpack the issues of gerrymandering (Session 1), constituent delineation (Session 2) and discuss electoral reforms (Session 3).

On our first session, on 7th November, the discussion panel features Ong Kian Ming, member of the Democratic Action Party and MP for Serdang.
He will shed light on the phenomenon of gerrymandering and malapportionment. Together, you will find out where it comes from and why it is done. He will be assisted by a group of young lawyers which will make the topic more lively by facilitating a Gerrymandering game that you can join in!

If you want to know more about the topic, keep your calendars free for Sessions 2 (21st November) and 3 (28th November). More details will be announced shortly.

Admission is free and open to everyone.