Disney refuses to cut ‘gay moment’ from ‘Beauty and the Beast’ for Malaysia

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Director of the movie Bill Condon and composer Alan Menken pose with cast members Dan Stevens, Luke Evans, Emma Watson, Josh Gad, Audra McDonald and Gugu Mbatha-Raw at the premiere of "Beauty and the Beast" in Los Angeles, California, U.S. March 2, 2017.   REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Director of the movie Bill Condon and composer Alan Menken pose with cast members Dan Stevens, Luke Evans, Emma Watson, Josh Gad, Audra McDonald and Gugu Mbatha-Raw at the premiere of “Beauty and the Beast” in Los Angeles, California, U.S. March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

LOS ANGELES, March 15 — Walt Disney Co indefinitely pulled Beauty and the Beast from theaters in Malaysia rather than remove scenes involving a gay character to placate local authorities.

“The film has not been and will not be cut for Malaysia,” Disney said in an emailed statement.

Golden Screen Cinemas, Malaysia’s largest theater chain, said Monday it postponed showings of Beauty and the Beast at the studio’s request. Golden Screen will offer refunds to patrons who purchased advance tickets to screenings and a related event, the company said on its website.

Malaysia’s Film Censorship Board approved Beauty and the Beast for a P13 rating after requesting cuts of about 4 1/2 minutes from a subplot with a “gay moment,” Abdul Halim Abdul Hamid, the film board chairman, said in a text message. Theaters can screen the film at any time after the deletions, he said. A P13 rating requires those below 13 years of age to be accompanied by a guardian. Read more

Beauty will not meet her Beast after all in Malaysia

Source: FMT News

Dan Stevens (kiri) bersama Emma Watson bergambar ketika promosi ‘Beauty and the Beast’ di London pada 23 Februari 2017. — Foto Reuters

Actors Dan Stevens (L) and Emma Watson pose for photographers at a media event for the film Beauty and the Beast in London, Britain February 23, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall

PETALING JAYA: Just when we thought Beauty and her Beast could come out to play, it looks like they will have to stay behind closed doors now that the local distributor has decided to shelve the release of the movie indefinitely despite getting the green light from the Malaysian Censorship Board (LPF) .

“Beauty and the Beast” met with controversy recently when its director Bill Condon revealed that the movie contained a “nice exclusive gay moment” involving one its characters.

Speaking to The Associated Press, LPF chairman Abdul Halim Abdul Hamid confirmed that the controversial homosexual scene had been axed as it was deemed inappropriate to Malaysian audiences, and the movie given a PG13 rating, requiring that children below 13 years of age be accompanied by a parent.

“We have approved it but there is a minor cut involving a gay moment. It is only one short scene but it is inappropriate because many children will be watching this movie,” Abdul Halim told AP.

He also said the film’s distributor The Walt Disney Co (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd had not appealed to the LPF about their decision to cut the gay scene. Read more

Excessive film censorship will make Malaysians narrow-minded, deputy minister says

Source: The Malay Mail Online

dewan_rakyat_signpost_2015_-_parliament_reportKUALA LUMPUR, April 4 — Too much censorship of movies involving sensitivities on religion, violence and sex would make Malaysians a narrow-minded lot, Deputy Home Minister Datuk Nur Jazlan Mohamed said today.

Nur Jazlan said censorship is only required for scenes that violate certain guidelines set by the Film Censorship Board (LPF) and the religious authorities here.

“The presence of the LPF was meant to educate viewers so that they can make the best choice (in watching film).

“If we want to restrict all content made by film producers, it will not be good education or culture for viewers in our country. We wanted to provide more space to the viewers to open up their minds,” he told the Dewan Rakyat today. Read more

No mocking Putrajaya, no deviants… local films get list of dos and don’ts

Source: The Malaysian Insider

Censorship - good or bad?

Censorship – good or bad?

Putrajaya tightened the noose on freedom of expression when it recently issued a directive banning scenes critical of the government in all local films aired on television.

The ban, issued through a circular from the Malaysian Film Censorship Board (LPF) dated June 23, stated that scenes and dialogue which “mock, belittle, criticise the government and the country’s national sensitivities” will be censored from local films on television, along with scenes and dialogue that “tarnish the government’s image”.

Examples of such scenes include those that depict civil servants accepting bribes or abusing their power, according to the circular.

Defending this move, LPF chairman Datuk Abdul Halim Abdul Hamid said such measures were necessary to protect Putrajaya’s image.

“We really can’t allow that, because it involves our image. It can bring a bad image for the government, so we avoid this,” he told The Malaysian Insider.

SIDE VIEW: Why censorship remains essential — Adrian Lee Yuen Beng [13 Jul 2015]

Read more