Activist seeks review of Film Censorship Act

Source: FMT News

Activist Lena Hendry (second from right) hands over her complaints to Suhakam commissioners Mah Weng Kwai (middle) and Jerald Joseph (second from right), pic from FMT News.

Activist Lena Hendry (second from right) hands over her complaints to Suhakam commissioners Mah Weng Kwai (middle) and Jerald Joseph (second from left), pic from FMT News.

KUALA LUMPUR: Human rights activist Lena Hendry, who was recently found guilty of screening an uncensored film, is making a last-minute plea for a review of the law she was convicted under.

Facing a possible three-year jail sentence, she said the Film Censorship Act needed to be reviewed as the law was “quite outdated”.

She said it could be seen as a blanket ban on whoever had a video on their handphones that was not filtered by the authorities.

She said they could be found guilty because of that, she told Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) commissioners Mah Weng Kwai and Jerald Joseph when filing a complaint against the law. Read more

Rights groups rail against activist’s conviction for screening film

Source: FMT News

Suaram condemns attempt to punish Lena Hendry for simply screening a documentary on the Sri Lankan civil war while Human Rights Watch alleges political motivation. Pic from FMT News.

Suaram condemns attempt to punish Lena Hendry for simply screening a documentary on the Sri Lankan civil war while Human Rights Watch alleges political motivation. Pic from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Human rights groups are crying foul over the conviction of activist Lena Hendry for her role in showing a documentary film on war crimes committed during Sri Lanka’s civil war.

The programme coordinator at rights group Pusat Komas was found guilty by the Magistrates’ Court yesterday of screening an uncensored documentary, “No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka”, on July 3, 2013.

“No Fire Zone” tells the story of war crimes committed in the last months of Sri Lanka’s civil war in 2009.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) called the conviction a violation of Lena’s freedom of expression, adding that it was not in line with international rights standards.

In a statement today, HRW said the move appeared to be motivated by Putrajaya’s desire to appease the Sri Lankan embassy officials whom the NGO said had publicly demanded that the film not be shown. They had also visited the venue on the day of the film’s screening to urge venue managers to cancel the event, HRW said. Read more