Report: Woman wasn’t denied entry at Parliament because of skirt

Source: FMT News

Senior Parliament official says CCTV footage confirms security officers did not stop WAO staff over dress code, but because she was not on any MP's guest list. Pic from FMT News.

Senior Parliament official says CCTV footage confirms security officers did not stop WAO staff over dress code, but because she was not on any MP’s guest list. Pic from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: There is no truth to allegations that a women’s rights organisation staff had been barred from entering the Parliament building because she breached the dress code, The Malay Mail reported yesterday.

The claim that security personnel had initially denied entry to Women’s Aid Organisation (WAO) assistant treasurer Meera Samanther because her skirt was too short, was denied by Parliament’s corporate communications division head Tengku Nasaruddin Tengku Mohamed.

“Meera arrived at 9.01am. The permission was given seven minutes later after security personnel confirmed with Ipoh Barat MP M Kulasegaran she was his guest.

“The results of the investigation contradict with what Meera claimed. She was not stopped for indecent dressing,” Tengku Nasaruddin told the daily yesterday.

He added that Meera was barred from entering the Parliament grounds because of safety reasons as they did not have prior information of her attendance. Read more

Parliament under threat from a skirt — Women’s Aid Organisation

Source: The Malay Mail Online

download (1)APRIL 11 — Our right to enter Parliament is in danger. But it’s not from security threats or drastic policy changes — it’s from arbitrary bureaucratic rules.

Seemingly minor rules make it harder for Malaysians, especially women, to enter Parliament. This may not seem dramatic, but these rules create bigger obstacles for us to engage with our MPs.

Many of these rules fall under the guise of “security”, such as a rule requiring guests to register five days in advance of their visit. Yet, such rules hinder us from contacting our MPs at the last minute, or engaging with our MPs in other ways.

Even more concerning are the added barriers women face compared to men. Just a few days ago, Parliament security personnel stopped two representatives from Women’s Aid Organisation when they tried to enter Parliament for a press conference. The security personnel deemed their knee-length skirts as too short. Read more

Banned from Parliament lobby? Not the first… and likely not the last time media faces problems there

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Members of the media are not allowed to cross the red tape and into the lobby in Parliament. — Picture by Azneal Ishak for the MMO.

Members of the media are not allowed to cross the red tape and into the lobby in Parliament. — Picture by Azneal Ishak for the MMO.

KUALA LUMPUR, March 23 ― Dewan Rakyat Speaker Tan Sri Pandikar Amin Mulia’s decision to banish reporters from Parliament’s lobby area on Tuesday is not the first time media coverage has been restricted in the august House.

In 2008, the Speaker issued a similar ban but this was lifted after a huge outcry from members of the media.

Here, Malay Mail Online lists three other times journalists faced obstacles while trying to do their jobs covering proceedings in Parliament. Read more

What system of governance: Theocracy, democracy or secular? — Jahaberdeen Mohamed Yunoos

Source: The Malay Mail Online

BY JAHABERDEEN MOHAMED YUNOOS

An opinion piece - file pic

An opinion piece – file pic

SEPT 19 — To me, and I repeat, to me, it is not about being obsessed with the label of “secular” or “Islamic” country though I do not have serious problems with people using the term. I try to understand what they are actually saying as the substance is more important than the label.

My position is clear: I do not support oppressive regimes or ideas whether they are labelled “secular” or “Islamic”. To be clear, I do not support a “secular system” that is anti religion as that is oppressive of a person’s faith. Likewise I do not support an “Islamic system” that takes away the professed Muslim’s inherent right to serve Allah as he understands it from the Quran as that is equally oppressive of faith.

In any case, I believe the practice of one’s faith or religion should not be allowed to affect national security, general public order, peace and harmony in the country or deny the basic fundamental rights and liberties of other citizens guaranteed under our Federal Constitution.

A theocratic state is often understood to be a political State which is founded on a particular religion. A theocracy may be defined as a form of government which defers not to civil development of law, but to an interpretation of the ‘will of a God’ as set out in religious scripture and authorities.  Read more