PAS starts donation drive for Sarawak Report lawsuit

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Tuan Ibrahim announced the drive while opening its youth wing’s meeting here, urging each member to contribute RM5 to the fund. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa for the MMO.

Tuan Ibrahim announced the drive while opening its youth wing’s meeting here, urging each member to contribute RM5 to the fund. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa for the MMO.

ALOR SETAR, April 27 — PAS kicked off today a donation drive among members to fund its lawsuit against UK-based website Sarawak Report.

The Islamist party’s deputy president Datuk Tuan Ibrahim Tuan Man who announced the drive while opening its youth wing’s meeting here, urged each member to contribute RM5 to the fund.

“Today, we will start a special fund to collect money to fund the lawsuit,” he said.

PAS is planning to sue the website for claiming its party leaders had received monies linked to 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB). Read more

Aktivis Swiss desak DiCaprio pulangkan wang rakyat Malaysia

Sumber: FMT News

Oleh Raevathi Supramaniam

Bintang filem Hollywood itu berada di London untuk tayangan perdana dokumentari mengenai perubahan iklim dan turut dijemput ke sidang akhbar mengenai 1MDB anjuran Bruno Manser Fond. Gambar dari FMT News.

Bintang filem Hollywood itu berada di London untuk tayangan perdana dokumentari mengenai perubahan iklim dan turut dijemput ke sidang akhbar mengenai 1MDB anjuran Bruno Manser Fond. Gambar dari FMT News.

LONDON: Kumpulan aktivis berpangkalan di Switzerland, Bruno Manser Fond mendesak pelakon Leonardo DiCaprio memulangkan semula AS$25 juta yang diperoleh menerusi filem “Wolf of Wall Street” kepada rakyat Malaysia.

Kumpulan itu turut mendesak DiCaprio menarik diri sebagai duta keamanan Pertubuhan Bangsa-bangsa Bersatu untuk perubahan iklim.

“DiCaprio kurang layak untuk peranan seperti itu,” kata pengarah eksekutif kumpulan itu, Lukas Straumann yang mendakwa DiCaprio dan yayasannya menerima manfaat daripada pembabitannya dengan Jho Low dan Riza Aziz, menerusi sumbangan lebih AS$2 juta yang diterima yayasan itu.

“Dia berhutang dengan rakyat Malaysia akauntabiliti terhadap ikatan kewangannya bersama Jho Low dan Riza Aziz,” katanya. Read more

1MDB: The inside story of the world’s biggest financial scandal

Source: The Guardian

On 22 June 2015, Xavier Justo, a 48-year-old retired Swiss banker, walked towards the front door of his brand new boutique hotel on Koh Samui, a tropical Thai island. He had spent the past three years building the luxurious white-stone complex of chalets and apartments overlooking the shimmering sea and was almost ready to open for business. All he needed was a licence.

Justo had arrived in Thailand four years earlier, having fled the drab world of finance in London. In 2011, he and his girlfriend Laura toured the country on a motorbike and, two years later, they got married on a secluded beach. The couple eventually settled down in Koh Samui, a tourist hotspot, just an hour’s flight south of Bangkok. After trying out a couple of entrepreneurial ventures, Justo eventually decided that he would go into the hotel business. He bought a plot with an imposing house and began building: adding a gym, villas and a tennis court.

That June afternoon, he was expecting a visit from the tourism authorities to sign off on the paperwork. Instead, a squad of armed Thai police burst through the unlocked door, bundling Justo to the ground. The officers tied their plastic cuffs so tightly around Justo’s wrists that he bled on the dark tiled floor. The police quickly moved into his office, ripping out the computers and emptying the filing cabinets.

After two days in a ramshackle local jail, Justo was flown to Bangkok and paraded before the media, in a press conference befitting a mafia kingpin. Still wearing shorts and flip-flops, he was flanked by four commandos holding machine guns, while a quartet of senior Royal Thai Police officers briefed the assembled reporters on the charges against him.

Justo was charged with an attempt to blackmail his former employer, a little-known London-based oil-services company named PetroSaudi. But behind this seemingly mundane charge lay a much bigger story.

Six months earlier, Justo had handed a British journalist named Clare Rewcastle Brown thousands of documents, including 227,000 emails, from the servers of his former employer, PetroSaudi, which appeared to shed light on the alleged theft of hundreds of millions of dollars from a state-owned Malaysian investment fund known as 1MDB.

The documents that Justo leaked have set off a chain reaction of investigations in at least half a dozen countries, and led to what Loretta Lynch, the US attorney general, described last week as “the largest kleptocracy case” in US history. Read more

Time to replace Official Secrets Act — Syahredzan Johan

Source: The Star Online

BY SHAHREDZAN JOHAN

A few days ago, the Sarawak Report published an article claiming to be in possession of a leaked Auditor General’s (AG) report on the troubled state-owned company, 1MDB.

The AG’s report has been classified under the Official Secrets Act (OSA), the Act governing official secrets and information in this country.

In response to the alleged leak, Communications and Multimedia Minister Datuk Seri Dr Salleh Said Keruak called for a police investigation to determine how news portal Sarawak Report obtained the document.

He said the investigation had to be undertaken urgently and expeditiously to prevent further leakages of official secrets documents which ‘may put the country’s security in jeopardy.’

Meanwhile, the Inspector General of Police will investigate Sarawak Report under the OSA if it is found to have published classified contents.

If indeed Sarawak Report has published a document classified under the OSA, the people behind the blog would certainly have committed several offences under the OSA. Read more

Malaysia disconnecting from online freedoms — Susan Leong & Terence Lee

Source: East Asia Forum

BY SUSAN LEONG & TERENCE LEE

Not long ago, the Malaysian government thought that mastery of the internet was a path towards economic development. In February 1996, it launched the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC), essentially a special economic zone, to entice high-technology corporations like Microsoft to set up shop in Malaysia.Malaysian children surf the Internet. (Photo: AAP)

To ensure the MSC’s appeal to prospective technology investors, restrictions on both the information technology market and on online expression were loosened. Whereas television, radio and newspapers remained restricted by laws like the Printing Presses and Publications Act, concessions to freedom of business ownership, employment quotas and censorship of the internet were made for the MSC.

Yet recently, two acts — the Communications and Multimedia Act (CMA Act) and the Sedition Act — have been used repeatedly to contain the zeal with which Malaysians have taken to the internet. Read more

Misuse of the Communications and Multimedia Act 1998 to Stifle Freedom of Speech and Expression Must End – Malaysian Bar

Press Release

Misuse of the Communications and Multimedia Act 1998
to Stifle Freedom of Speech and Expression Must End

The Malaysian Bar is aghast at the decision of the Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (“MCMC”) — pursuant to Sections 233 and 263(2) of the Communications and Multimedia Act 1998 (“CMA”) — to deny public access to The Malaysian Insider (“TMI”) online news portal indefinitely.

MCMC announced the decision in its statement dated 25 February 2016, without giving any specific reason.  However, it appears that MCMC has taken action against TMI because TMI allegedly published matters that have caused confusion.  MCMC has not identified the offending publication(s) by TMI that caused this purported confusion.

Communications and Multimedia Minister Datuk Seri Panglima Dr Mohd Salleh Tun Said Keruak has reportedly said that TMI has been blocked as one of the articles published by it “… quoted a statement that could cause confusion because it contradicts with official statements by MACC.  They don’t mention who the source is.  It could confuse the public.”[1]

Causing public confusion is not, and cannot be, an offence under Section 233 of the CMA.  MCMC’s reliance on Section 233 for its action against TMI is therefore without any basis, and   oppressive.  It is quite puzzling that anyone could consider causing public confusion to be an offence at all.  It is also rather demeaning and offensive to assume that Malaysians will be “confused” merely as a result of contradictory statements in the press, or because the source of press statements was not disclosed. Read more

CIJ urges vigilance over more censorship after TMI block

Source: Malaysiakini

The people must be vigilant over the possibility of the government imposing further censorship after it blocked news portal The Malaysian Insider (TMI) yesterday, Centre for Independent Journalism (CIJ) cautions.

“Malaysians should be very concerned with the increased cases of Internet censorship by the government in recent months, signalling worse days ahead for freedom of expression and information in Malaysia.

“We ask that Internet users in Malaysia be vigilant of further restrictions online, as it can impact access to vital information and possibly even lead to increase in cost of accessing information and technology,” CIJ said in a statement yesterday. Read more