There is an ‘opaqueness’ of info from govt: M’sian Bar, Hakam

Source: The Sun Daily

KUALA LUMPUR: The Malaysian Bar Council and National Human Rights Society (Hakam) feels there is an absolute “opaqueness” of information from the government on the issues of the “boat people” and Wang Kelian “death camps” that surfaced recently.

Today, both bodies were at the Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) office to hand over two memorandums.

They called for Suhakam to investigate how these issues started and the current conditions of the boat people housed in detention centres in Belantik, Kedah, and the issue of human trafficking. Read more

Suhakam to probe on uncovered human trafficking grave sites

Source: The Rakyat Post

Suhakam commissioner Francis Johen Adam (second from right) receiving the memorandum on boat people and death camps from Bar Council's Migrants, Refugees & Immigration Affairs Committee chairperson Datuk M. Ramachelvam. Looking on is Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan (second from left) and Bar Council chairperson Steven Thiru (in grey coat). — TRP pic Azrol Ali

Suhakam commissioner Francis Johen Adam (second from right) receiving HAKAM’s Memorandum as well as Bar Council’s Memorandum on boat people and death camps from Bar Council’s Migrants, Refugees & Immigration Affairs Committee chairperson Datuk M. Ramachelvam. Looking on are HAKAM Secretary-General Robyn Choi (far left), HAKAM President Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan (second from left) and Bar Council President Steven Thiru (in grey coat), along with Suhakam commissioner Prof Datuk Dr Aishah Bidin. — TRP pic Azrol Ali

KUALA LUMPUR, June 17, 2015 — Investigations by the Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) is important even if its findings are ignored, prominent legal advocate Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan said.

She pointed out that the process throws up evidence and makes public aware.

“Hence, it’s very important for Suhakam to look into issues at hand,” said Ambiga who is also National Human Rights Society (HAKAM) president.

“In Malaysia, we are used to getting reports and nothing being done. Perhaps the authorities are betting on Malaysians easily letting things go.”

She said this after submitting a memorandum over the discovery of mass graves, human trafficking and death camps in Malaysia, to Suhakam this morning. Read more

Marital rape should be a crime, but it is not, yet

Source: The Star Online

By refusing to criminalise marital rape or even acknowledge that sex without consent between a husband and wife is rape, the Government is failing to protect women who are raped by their spouses.

And it does happen. Often. Read more

Ambiga: Putrajaya ‘paranoid’ in enacting security laws tougher than US, UK, Australia

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan ― MMO File pic

Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan ― MMO File pic

KUALA LUMPUR, June 17 ― Malaysia appears “paranoid” after the government introduced new anti-terror laws that are harsher than countries at greater risks of terrorism, lawyer Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan has said.

Ambiga said Malaysia’s new Prevention of Terrorism Act (Pota) does not allow the judiciary to have oversight over suspected terrorists, compared to the laws in the US, UK and Australia that have “far more serious” terror threats.

“So in other words, we have tougher laws than countries that are far more in danger of terrorism. It shows you that we perhaps are paranoid,” the former Malaysian Bar president told a crowd of around 50 people at a forum last night. Read more

MEMORANDUM TO SUHAKAM: Discovery of Mass Graves in Malaysia – Human Trafficking Death Camps

PrintpdfMEMORANDUM TO SUHAKAM

Discovery of Mass Graves in Malaysia
– Human Trafficking Death Camps

Date: 17 June 2015

HAKAM’s Complaint

1. The National Human Rights Society (HAKAM) hereby lodges a formal complaint with SUHAKAM in respect of the circumstances surrounding the disclosure of unexplained deaths through the discovery of 139 mass graves at the Malaysian Thai-borders, the existence of transit camps and the recent news of dumped bodies of foreign nationals in Penang. Read more

Cabinet forms committee on indigenous land rights

Source: The Star Online

PETALING JAYA: The long-awaited decision on indigenous land rights is finally out.

The Cabinet approved all 18 recommendations of a task force that looked into Suhakam’s inquiry report on indigenous land rights, except for the setting up of the Commission on Indigenous Peoples.

Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Paul Low said the Cabinet had on June 3 also approved the formation of a Cabinet Committee for the Land Rights of Indigenous Peoples to address, monitor and implement the findings of the Government’s task force’s report dated Aug 14.

The Cabinet Committee will be headed by Deputy Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyidin Yassin. Read more

Lawyer: Sedition Act aimed at imprisoning minds

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Syahredzan Johan speaks at a forum on the Sedition Act at Wisma HELP, Kuala Lumpur, March 12, 2015. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

Syahredzan Johan speaks at a forum on the Sedition Act at Wisma HELP, Kuala Lumpur, March 12, 2015. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

KUALA LUMPUR, June 17 — The amended Sedition Act that now imposes a minimum three years’ jail term is meant to “imprison” the minds of Malaysians, civil liberties lawyer Syahredzan Johan has said.

Syahredzan said the Sedition Act is actually intended to create a “chilling effect” and strike fear in Malaysians, but urged his countrymen to continue to speak out.

“And that’s enough, they have achieved their purpose. The purpose isn’t actually to detain, to have this law and use it on everyone, they won’t have resources for that, but it is to imprison your mind, to make you feel afraid,” he told a forum here last night.

“So now that we know this is enough, are we just going to keep quiet, or are we going to keep at it, keep speaking up? Because we know this is a constitutionally guaranteed fundamental liberty, the right to freedom of speech and expression and no one can take that away from us,” he said. Read more

Putrajaya has no faith in courts, lawyer tells forum

Source: The Malaysian Insider

Civil liberties lawyer Syahredzan Johan believes Putrajaya’s move to reintroduce detention without trial is indicative of its lack of faith in Malaysian courts. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, June 17, 2015.

Civil liberties lawyer Syahredzan Johan believes Putrajaya’s move to reintroduce detention without trial is indicative of its lack of faith in Malaysian courts. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, June 17, 2015.

Putrajaya’s move to reintroduce detention without trial through the controversial Prevention of Terrorism Act is itself an indication that it has no faith in Malaysian courts, civil liberties lawyer Syahredzan Johan said at a forum in Kuala Lumpur last night.

Speaking on the act and the recent amendments to the Sedition Act, Syahredzan questioned the need for the government to take the “short cut” in detaining someone without going to the courts.

In the anti-terror legislation, an individual can be detained without trial for two years and then have the term renewed indefinitely.

Detention without trial was previously abolished with the Internal Security Act and the Emergency Ordinance in 2011. Read more

Move to amend Whistleblower Act

Source: The Star Online

THE Government wants to amend the Whistleblower Protection Act 2010 to improve the integrity of enforcement officers, especially those stationed at the country’s borders.

Deputy Home Minister Datuk Seri Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar said the Prime Minister’s Department had received feedback on measures to improve the Act. Read more