Tan Sri Razali Ismail is new Suhakam chairman

Source: NST Online

Tan Sri Razali Ismail has been announced as the new chairman of the Human Rights Commission (Suhakam), effective immediately. — NST FIle pic

Tan Sri Razali Ismail has been announced as the new chairman of the Human Rights Commission (Suhakam), effective immediately. — NST FIle pic

PUTRAJAYA: Tan Sri Razali Ismail has been announced as the new chairman of the Human Rights Commission (Suhakam), effective immediately.

Razali is the chairman of the Global Movement of Moderates Foundation, with a career spanning more than 35 years with the Malaysian Diplomatic Service.

Announcing this in a statement today, Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak also unveiled the names of six other new Suhakam members.

They are Prof Datuk Dr Aishah Bidin, Francis Johen a/k Adam; Datuk Mah Weng Kwai, Datuk Godfrey Gregory Joitol; Dr Nik Salida Suhaila Nik Salleh; Jerald Joseph and Datuk Lok Yim Pheng. Read more

We Need to Talk About an Injustice — Bryan Stevenson

Source: TED Talks

In an engaging and personal talk  with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks  human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America’s justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country’s black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America’s unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight and persuasiveness.

Stateless Rohingya children facing hardship

 

Report says children born to Rohingya who fled Myanmar to Malaysia don’t enjoy basic rights such as healthcare and education. Aljazeera file pic.

Report says children born to Rohingya who fled Myanmar to Malaysia don’t enjoy basic rights such as healthcare and education. Al-Jazeera file pic.

KUALA LUMPUR: Children of Rohingya parents who fled Myanmar to Malaysia are stateless and suffering, according to a report by Al-Jazeera.

It said many of the approximately 150,000 Rohingya who live in Malaysia came here hoping to be relocated to other countries through UNHCR programmes, but that some of them made Malaysia their home.

This, it said, was despite the fact that they have no legal status and, as a result, face many hardships.

Many Rohingya refugee children are born in Malaysia, and remain stateless owing to the undocumented status of their parents, the report said. Some of them are even second generation Malaysian-born.

It quoted Chia Wei, founder of The Berani Project, as saying the main consequences of this undefined status and lack of identification documents was that the children were cut off from the basic child’s rights to education and healthcare.

Liability for abuse of public duty — Gurdial Singh Nijar

Source : The Sun Daily

BY GURDIAL SINGH NIJAR
(Deputy President, HAKAM)

ROUTINELY, we hear cases of millions of ringgit of taxpayers’ money squandered by public officials.

The auditor-general’s annual reports list a litany of such cases – from overpriced binoculars to useless equipment and, most recently, RM10.3 million paid for an item that has not even been installed.

Can anything be done to make the abuser personally liable?

Yes. The public official or a public body can be held liable for a deliberate and dishonest abuse of power.

This is the tort of misfeasance in public office. The rationale? In a legal rule of law system, executive or administrative power must be exercised for the public good, not for improper purposes.

As declared a UK court: “We take it to be perfectly clear that if a public servant abuses his office either by an act of omission or commission, and the consequence of that is injury to an individual or loss of public property, an action may be maintained against such public servant: Henly v Lyme Corp (1928).” Read more