Education of Orang Asli kids being neglected

Source: FMT News

Orang Asli activist Colin Nicholas recalls horrific punishment for Orang Asli children by schools and teachers. Pic taken from FMT News.

Orang Asli activist Colin Nicholas recalls horrific punishment for Orang Asli children by schools and teachers. Pic taken from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Education for Orang Asli children is being neglected with unmotivated teachers being sent to teach them, Center for Orang Asli Concerns (COAC) Coordinator Colin Nicholas said.

On top of this, he told FMT that teachers stationed in rural areas were often under pressure to “show good results”.

“We have come across many cases where schools are under immense pressure to maintain the UPSR pass rate.

“They will do anything to get the weaker students out so that these children won’t sit for exams and bring down the overall results.”

Yesterday, FMT reported that teachers in a rural town in Kelantan were allegedly falsifying medical reports of Orang Asli children from a school, labelling them as intellectually disabled, to avoid being penalised for falling grades in the school.

Colin recalled his experiences with COAC, revealing there are many instances far worse than falsified medical reports.

For one, he noted the vast physical abuse Orang Asli students underwent which went unreported or unaddressed.

“Some of the punishments are terrible. It is something you will not find in normal schools.” Read more

‘Rethink redelineation exercise’

Source: The Star Online

Merdeka Centre director Ibrahim Suffian (left), and  South-East Asia political analyst Dr Bridget Welsh. Pic taken from The Star Online.

Merdeka Centre director Ibrahim Suffian (left), and South-East Asia political analyst Dr Bridget Welsh. Pic taken from The Star Online.

PETALING JAYA: There is a need to review how electoral boundaries are redelineated to prevent further divisive segregation of voters along ethnic lines, according to analysts.

Responding to the Election Commission’s proposal to alter the electoral boundaries of 113 parliamentary seats in the peninsula which has drawn wide criticism for creating fewer mixed seats and reinforcing mono-ethnic ones, Merdeka Centre director Ibrahim Suffian said the proposed boundaries could further entrench racial politics and discourse.

“Given that redelineation is an exercise that takes place every 10 years or so, this means the next decade will continue to see the continued trajectory along current trends.

“This is because elected representatives will be more attuned to their monoglot constituencies compared to the mixed ones of the past,” he said.

Political parties from Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Harapan along with NGOs and voters have stated that they will file objections against the EC’s proposal.

The EC will be holding a local inquiry after Oct 14 – when the one-month period to display the proposed re-delineation ends – in order to hear the objections.

Ibrahim said any redelineation along ethnic lines could hamper the move towards a shared Malaysian identity and be counterproductive to national interest.

A better option would be to draw constituency boundaries to reflect the communal mix in a state, he added. Read more

Putrajaya told to drop activist’s criminal case on showing Sri Lanka documentary

Source: The Malay Mail Online

The Star reported that the High Court reversed yesterday the acquittal of Lena Hendry (centre), who was charged under the Film Censorship Act 2002 for screening ‘No Fire Zone’ without approval from the Censorship Board, and ordered her to enter her defence. — Picture by Sulok Tawie

The Star reported that the High Court reversed yesterday the acquittal of Lena Hendry (centre), who was charged under the Film Censorship Act 2002 for screening ‘No Fire Zone’ without approval from the Censorship Board, and ordered her to enter her defence. — Picture by Sulok Tawie

KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 22 ― The Human Rights Watch (HRW) urged Malaysia today to end the prosecution of activist Lena Hendry for illegally screening a documentary on war crimes in Sri Lanka.

The global human rights group said criminalising the screening of films without government approval imposed a “disproportionate” burden on the right to freedom of expression.

“Prosecuting Lena Hendry for the private showing of an award-winning film is all part of the Malaysia government’s intensified intimidation, harassment, and criminalisation of human rights defenders,” Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director at HRW, said in a statement.

“The government should end Hendry’s three-year ordeal by dropping the charges and then promptly amending the Film Censorship Act so no other activists face prison just for showing a movie,” he added.

Local daily The Star reported that the High Court here reversed yesterday the acquittal of Hendry, who was charged under the Film Censorship Act 2002 for screening “No Fire Zone” without approval from the Censorship Board, and ordered her to enter her defence. Read more