Aktivis Swiss desak DiCaprio pulangkan wang rakyat Malaysia

Sumber: FMT News

Oleh Raevathi Supramaniam

Bintang filem Hollywood itu berada di London untuk tayangan perdana dokumentari mengenai perubahan iklim dan turut dijemput ke sidang akhbar mengenai 1MDB anjuran Bruno Manser Fond. Gambar dari FMT News.

Bintang filem Hollywood itu berada di London untuk tayangan perdana dokumentari mengenai perubahan iklim dan turut dijemput ke sidang akhbar mengenai 1MDB anjuran Bruno Manser Fond. Gambar dari FMT News.

LONDON: Kumpulan aktivis berpangkalan di Switzerland, Bruno Manser Fond mendesak pelakon Leonardo DiCaprio memulangkan semula AS$25 juta yang diperoleh menerusi filem “Wolf of Wall Street” kepada rakyat Malaysia.

Kumpulan itu turut mendesak DiCaprio menarik diri sebagai duta keamanan Pertubuhan Bangsa-bangsa Bersatu untuk perubahan iklim.

“DiCaprio kurang layak untuk peranan seperti itu,” kata pengarah eksekutif kumpulan itu, Lukas Straumann yang mendakwa DiCaprio dan yayasannya menerima manfaat daripada pembabitannya dengan Jho Low dan Riza Aziz, menerusi sumbangan lebih AS$2 juta yang diterima yayasan itu.

“Dia berhutang dengan rakyat Malaysia akauntabiliti terhadap ikatan kewangannya bersama Jho Low dan Riza Aziz,” katanya. Read more

Malaysia’s Growing Crackdown on Dissent

Source: The Diplomat

A new report sheds light on a disturbing trend.

Prosecutors in the United States have filed civil lawsuits in July 2016 alleging that more than $3.5 billion was defrauded from 1MDB. Pic taken from FMT News.

Prosecutors in the United States had filed civil lawsuits in July 2016 alleging that more than $3.5 billion was defrauded from 1MDB. Pic taken from FMT News.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak and his government have come under fire for the jailing of opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim and a crackdown on dissent, particularly the pro-democracy movement Bersih.

But a 40-page report by Human Rights Watch (HRW) found the Malaysian government has spread prosecutions of peaceful speech over the last 12-months beyond activists and politicians to ordinary citizens on social media.

“Criminalizing peaceful speech appears part of the Malaysian government’s larger effort to tighten the noose on anyone expressing political discontent,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch.

“The authorities should cease prosecuting people for criticism or perceived ‘insults,’ and the government should urgently revise its laws to meet international free expression standards.”

The report, Deepening the Culture of Fear: The Criminalization of Peaceful Expression in Malaysia, documents the government’s use of broad, vaguely worded laws to criminalize peaceful speech and assembly.

It said the government had sought to punish individuals who criticized Najib’s administration, particularly in regards to a massive corruption scandal involving the government-owned 1 Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB). Read more

In plea to MPs, CCM says Hadi’s Bill will ‘radically’ rewrite constitution

Source: The Malay Mail Online

hermen-shastri1-150813_620_412_100

CCM secretary-general Reverend Dr Hermen Shastri urges MPs not to look at the Bill lightly and instead view it with ‘great concern and alarm’. — Picture by Choo Choy May

KUALA LUMPUR, Oct 15 ― The Council of Churches of Malaysia (CCM) today warned MPs against Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang’s Private Member’s Bill that is intended to empower Shariah Courts, saying that a vote for the Bill will “radically” rewrite the Federal Constitution.

In an open letter just two days before the upcoming parliamentary session, CCM secretary-general Reverend Dr Hermen Shastri urged MPs not to look at the Bill lightly and instead view it with “great concern and alarm”.

“Lawmakers must not treat Hadi’s attempt to alter our country’s justice system set in place by our founding fathers and consistently sustained for over 55 years lightly.

“Hadi’s Bill is not just about upgrading the power of the Shariah Courts, it is rewriting the constitution in a radical way,” he said in his letter.

Shastri pointed out that Shariah Courts were established and regulated by state laws, and that their powers and offences were defined by the Federal Constitution.

He added that the ramification to widen Islamic laws was not only limited to those who are Muslims, but was also a matter of concern in allowing future state laws to be altered by federal powers. Read more

Vote against Hadi’s Private Members Bill — Malaysian Consultative Council of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Sikhism, and Taoism

Source: The Malay Mail Online

An opinion piece - file pic

An opinion piece – file pic

OCTOBER 15 — The  Malaysian  Counsultative  Council  of  Buddhism, Christianity, Hindusim, Sikhism and Taosim (MCCBCHST) is gravely concerned with Hadi’s Private Members Bill  which will be coming up for debate soon in our Federal Parliament. As the Bill will have far-reaching consequences for the Nation, the MCCBCHST feels duty-bound to issue this open letter to Members of Parliament to do their duty as required by their oath of office to protect our Federal Consitution.

I Is Hadi’s Private Member’s Bill a Bill empowering HUDUD offences?

The answer is a clear ‘YES’. Here is why

The aim of Hadi’s Private Member’s Bill is to seek Parliament’s approval to enhance the Jurisdiction of the Syariah Courts. Presently the Syariah Courts can only impose punishments up to 3 years imprisonment, fine up to  RM5,000.00 and whipping up to 6 lashes (commonly known as 3-5-6 limits). This is provided for by the Syariah Court (Criminal Jurisdiction) Act 1965 (Act 355). Read more

Unchecked development, demolishing old buildings can alter city’s identity, forum told

Source: The Malay Mail Online

The Research for Social Advancement, Relevant Facts, Sparkling Analysis (Refsa) centre holding a forum on ‘Pudu: Urban Identity and Symbolism’. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

The Research for Social Advancement, Relevant Facts, Sparkling Analysis (Refsa) centre holding a forum on ‘Pudu: Urban Identity and Symbolism’. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

KUALA LUMPUR, Oct 15 — Reckless demolition of historical buildings come at a cost as unchecked development will drastically alter the capital city’s identity, analysts told a forum on urban identity today.

While tearing down older buildings is necessary in the name of development, proper research must be undertaken before deciding to do so, they added.

Citing the demolishment of the Pudu Jail as an example, two analysts from the Penang Institute said tearing down the 115 year-old building to build a shopping centre was not the “smartest move”.

“The former KL Mayor had said that the Pudu Jail needed to be demolished to ease traffic congestion but it actually makes no difference or perhaps would make the traffic situation a little worse with the building of Bukit Bintang City Centre there,” political and social analyst Ooi Kok Hin said.

“Maybe, they (the government) demolish a building because they don’t want to be reminded of that place in the future but a proper study must be undertaken to lay the pros and cons before tearing down an old place,” he added.

Ooi and his fellow analyst Evelyn Teh were speaking on a topic entitled “Pudu: Urban Identity and Symbolism” at the Research for Social Advancement (Refsa) centre. Read more

It’s a motion: Legislative process for Private Member’s Bill — Ooi Heng

Source: The Malay Mail Online

BY OOI HENG

Malaysian Parliament — MMO file pic

Malaysian Parliament — MMO file pic

OCTOBER 15 — Dewan Rakyat will resume sitting on the 17th of October. The Dewan Rakyat Order Paper showed that the first four items of business consists of three motions and one Government Bill. The motion by the President of Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party (PAS) and Member of Parliament (MP) for Marang, Hadi Awang, is being listed as the fourth item. It is understandable that the media are focusing on this fourth item.

In the past, the media tend to make such reports, treating a motion as a bill, and treating the legislative procedure of a Private Member’s Bill as the same as that of a Government Bill. Dealing with the controversial ‘Hudud issue’, the media currently need to present the aspects of the different legislative procedures.

The legislative procedures for Government Bills and non-Government Bills are not indifferent. Those being presented by Government frontbenchers or ‘MPs who are ministers’ are Government Bills, while those being presented by the so-called ‘ordinary Members of Parliament’ (ordinary MPs) or ‘MPs who are not ministers’ are non-Government Bills. The Government frontbenchers are representing the executive branch, while the ordinary MPs consisting of government backbenchers, opposition MPs and independent MPs, are representing the legislative branch. Read more

Many against EC’s new lines

Source: The Star Online

Infographic by Merdeka Center

Infographic by Merdeka Center

PETALING JAYA: More than a hundred objections – probably the lar­gest number ever – have been filed against the Election Commis­sion’s controversial redelineation of state and parliament seats ahead of the next general election.

State governments, local authorities and groups of 100 or more vo­ters – including those organised by poli­tical parties – are allowed to submit objections. The deadline for doing so was yesterday.

The EC’s proposal to alter the boundaries in 128 of the 222 Par­liament seats has drawn flak from parties and voters who claim the move strengthens mono ethnic majority seats while reducing ethnically mixed seats, thus further sharpening racial polarisation.

It has also been criticised for wi­dening the size gap between seats instead of narrowing them.

The numbers of objections was described by former EC chairman Tan Sri Abdul Rahid Abdul Rahman as possibly the biggest in a redelineation exercise, which by law can only be done once every eight years. Read more