Polis tahan 3 lelaki pasang iklan solidariti Anwar

Sumber: Malaysiakini

Polis menahan tiga lelaki bagi membantu siasatan berhubung pemasangan papan iklan dipercayai cuba menghasut rakyat berhimpun untuk bekas ketua pembangkang Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim, hari ini.

Ketua Polis Daerah Seberang Perai Tengah (SPT) ACP Nik Ros Azhan Nik Abdul Hamid berkata tiga lelaki berusia 50-an itu ditahan ketika memasang papan iklan berkenaan di Jalan Baru, Perai di Bukit Mertajam, kira-kira 3 petang tadi.

“Pihak polis membuka siasatan mengikut Akta Hasutan selepas menerima laporan polis daripada orang awam berhubung pemasangan papan iklan berkenaan yang didakwa cuba menghasut rakyat.

“Semasa siasatan dijalankan, polis mengesan tiga lelaki sedang memasang papan iklan itu di kawasan Jalan Baru dan kami menahan mereka bagi membantu siasatan,” katanya ketika dihubungi Bernama di Bukit Mertajam, malam ini.

Katanya tiga lelaki itu kemudiannya dibebaskan dengan jaminan polis selepas pihaknya merekodkan keterangan mereka. Read more

Activist’s daughter fights back, claims Malaysians living in fear

Source: FMT News

Sharifah Fareena says her mother's arrest shows that freedom of speech and expression are not accepted in Malaysia. Pic from FMT News.

Sharifah Fareena says her mother’s arrest shows that freedom of speech and expression are not accepted in Malaysia. Pic from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Environmentalist Shariffa Sabrina Syed Akil’s daughter has spoken up against her mother’s arrest, calling it another form of injustice.

Sharifah Fareena Syed Yusof in a statement posted by Sabrina on her Facebook, said she was saddened by the incident that saw her mother locked up for three days, and decided to fight back against those who condemned activists that are speaking for the voiceless. Read more

So what’s that about human rights? — Boo Su-Lyn

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Boo Su-Lyn is a feminist who loves reading fiction. She tweets at @boosulyn. Pic from the MMO.

Boo Su-Lyn is a feminist who loves reading fiction. She tweets at @boosulyn. Pic from the MMO.

DECEMBER 30 ― This year has seen widespread human rights violations in Malaysia, including attacks on freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, native rights, and the right to privacy.

The government appears to be increasingly intolerant of dissent and resorted to investigating trivial matters like the posting of “insulting” photos of leaders on WhatsApp, posting a video of a press conference, and various Facebook posts and tweets.

If Malaysia is serious about achieving developed nation status by 2020, then the government must acknowledge and respect basic human rights like freedom of speech and freedom of assembly. Without the space to express ideas and opinions, society cannot progress.

These are the top 8 human rights violations in the country in 2016, in no particular order: Read more

Nobel laureates criticise Aung San Suu Kyi, urge UN to intervene in Myanmar’s Rohingya crisis

Source: The Malay Mail Online

23 Nobel laureates, politicians, philanthropists and activists criticised Myanmar’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi (pic) for what they called a lack of initiative to protect the Rohingyas. — Reuters pic.

23 Nobel laureates, politicians, philanthropists and activists criticised Myanmar’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi (pic) for what they called a lack of initiative to protect the Rohingyas. — Reuters pic.

NEW YORK, Dec 30 — More than a dozen Nobel laureates yesterday urged the United Nations to “end the human crisis” of Myanmar’s Rohingya minority group, whose members have been fleeing to Bangladesh to escape a bloody military crackdown.

In an open letter addressed to the UN Security Council, 23 Nobel laureates, politicians, philanthropists and activists said “a human tragedy amounting to ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity is unfolding in Myanmar.”

They also criticised the country’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi — herself a Nobel Peace Prize winner — for what they called a lack of initiative to protect the Rohingyas. Read more

Allow refugees to work, says Amnesty Malaysia

Source: FMT News

There's no need to bring in more migrant workers when there are already people seeking asylum in the country. Pic form FMT News.

There’s no need to bring in more migrant workers when there are already people seeking asylum in the country. Pic form FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Amnesty International Malaysia has urged Putrajaya to look at Rohingya refugees as a source of labour to address the shortage it claims the country is facing.

Its executive director, Shamini Darshni Kaliemuthu, said a wise government would weigh this option against the need to bring in more foreign workers.

“We should be looking at the Rohingya as a work source,” she told FMT. “They are already here. We already have them. Allow them to work.”

Shamini called for a change of mindsets so that the public would begin to see refugees as part of the Malaysian community.

“We need to start looking at them as people who can help our country grow, not as people who are here to steal our jobs. They are here because they don’t have anywhere else to go.” Read more

‘Sarawak native land ruling does not cover other states’

Source: FMT News

Each region is governed by its own statutes, says former Federal Court judge Gopal Sri Ram. Pic form FMT News.

Each region is governed by its own statutes, says former Federal Court judge Gopal Sri Ram. Pic form FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: The native communities of Sabah and the peninsular states remain unaffected by a recent Federal Court ruling that defeated a bid to enable the Dayaks of Sarawak to apply native customary rights (NCR) on virgin forests, according to a retired judge.

Former Federal Court judge Gopal Sri Ram said the land laws were different for the three regions.

“The decision will not have a binding effect as Sarawak is governed by its land ordinance while Sabah and the states in Malaya are guided by their own statutes,” he said.

Last Dec 20, the Federal Court allowed the Sarawak Government’s appeal against a Court of Appeal decision that recognised “pemakai menoa” (territorial domains) and “pulau galau” (communal forest reserves) as NCR land.

The Court of Appeal had affirmed a 2011 High Court ruling in favour of Tuai Rumah Sandah and seven other landowners in Ulu Machan, Kanowit. Read more

Feeding the hungry with Robin Food, an app by four Malaysian teens

Source: Asian Correspondent

Image via YouTube

THE United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates that every year, some 1.3 billion tonnes of food are either lost or wasted, and that’s one-third of the world’s total annual consumption.

If the statistic doesn’t already turn your stomach, here’s another fact that will: The organisation also says that one in nine people (about 795 million of the world’s 7.3 billion populace) were suffering from chronic undernourishment between 2014 and 2016.

But a team of enterprising Malaysian teenagers have come up with a novel way to address the issue, using existing technology and a device that more than one-fifth of the world already use – the smartphone.

Introducing Robin Food, a food surplus mobile application that connects supermarkets with non-governmental and charitable organisations to help reduce food wastage and feed the hungry.

Like its name suggests, Robin Food is inspired by the heroic ideal of taking from the rich to feed the poor, as per the famous English folklore “Robin Hood”.

According to its creators – Joseph Chung Ming Chong, 14, Allegra Chan, 16, Ezra Adrian Robert, 15, and Ivan Avannus, 15, – Robin Food enables supermarkets and other corporations like hotels or mini-markets or even generous individuals to donate surplus food stocks to the needy with just a few screen taps.

Interested donors can use the application to inform food banks of the availability of access food at their premises and then arrange for a collection within minutes. Ultimately, it eliminates the tedious task of finding the best organisation to donate to and then seeking ways to get in touch with them, or on the reverse side, it also makes it easier for food banks in search of reliable donors.

The app, bankrolled by Malaysia-based multinational conglomerate Sime Darby Berhad, was the winning entry in this year’s Young Innovators challenge. It was launched on Dec 15 and is available for download in the Klang Valley across the Android and iOS smartphone platforms. Read more

How Malaysian, Indonesian anti-terror cops take the fight to Islamic militants, foil plots

Source: Asian Correspondent

Malaysian Pasukan Gerak Khas (PGK) elite police operatives moving crosshairs during a Close Quarters Combat drill. Image via @Wikipedia Commons.  Image taken from Asian Correspondent.

Malaysian Pasukan Gerak Khas (PGK) elite police operatives moving crosshairs during a Close Quarters Combat drill. Image via @Wikipedia Commons. Image taken from Asian Correspondent.

WHILE authorities around the world grapple with thwarting attacks by Muslim militants, counter-terrorism units in both Malaysia and Indonesia have been lauded for curbing dozens of bombing plots and assault attempts aimed at killing scores of innocents.

This year alone, Malaysian anti-terrorism police nabbed more than 115 people with links to global Islamist militant groups, preventing at least 14 attempted attacks, while their counterparts in neighbouring Indonesia — also a Muslim-majority country — had foiled at least 15 suicide attacks and bombing plots, with more than 150 arrests, according to various news reports.

Earlier this month, Malaysian police Special Branch (SB) Counter Terrorism Division principal assistant director Ayob Khan Mydin Pitchay, told a seminar on countering extremism at the University of Jordan that the majority of the Malaysian public were unaware of the looming threat of the Islamic State (IS) militants who had planned a series of attacks in his country.

Unlike many countries in Europe, Malaysia has yet to face any major attacks in recent memory, but Ayub Khan said the June 28 grenade attack on an entertainment centre in Puchong in the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur that left eight injured, was a wake up call on the imminent presence of IS.

“Many did not believe that the IS threat is clear and present. I have been talking about IS since 2013, but only after the bombing in Puchong did they (the public) believe it,” Ayob Khan was quoted as saying by national news agency Bernama. Read more

“Tangkap MO1” students take Universiti Malaya to court

Source: NST Online

Four UM students who were found guilty of participating in the "Tangkap MO1" rally held in Aug, initiated legal action to challenge the validity of university's disciplinary rules today, pic by Khairah N. Karim for NST.

Four UM students who were found guilty of participating in the “Tangkap MO1” rally held in Aug, initiated legal action to challenge the validity of university’s disciplinary rules today, pic by Khairah N. Karim for NST.

KUALA LUMPUR: Four Universiti Malaya (UM) students, who were found guilty of participating in the “Tangkap MO1” rally held in Aug, initiated legal action to challenge the validity of the university’s disciplinary rules today.

Students Anis Syafiqah Md Yusof, 24, Mohamad Luqman Nul Haqim Zul Razali, 23, Suhail Wan Azhar, 22, and Muhammad Luqman Hakim Mohd Fazli, 22, filed an originating summons seeking a declaration that UM’s (Discipline of Students) Rules 1999 is unconstitutional. In their action, they are requesting a proclamation that Section 15 (3)(b) of the Universities and University Colleges Act 1971; and Regulations 3 and 13 of the UM (Discipline of Students) Rules, which do not prohibit students from exercising their right to freedom of speech and expression and to participate in demonstrations, have contravened Article 10 (2) of the Federal Constitution. Read more

NGO asks if Federal Court overlooked Native Court

Source: FMT News

NGO says native customs in Borneo have been recognised as a parallel legal system under the Native Court, through the Native Court Ordinance. Pic form FMT News.

NGO says native customs in Borneo have been recognised as a parallel legal system under the Native Court, through the Native Court Ordinance. Pic form FMT News.

KUCHING: The Dayak National Congress (DNC), an NGO, said the Federal Court appears to be unaware that native customs are recognised as “a parallel legal system, apart, for civil law”.

This was provided under the Native Court, through the Native Court Ordinance, said DNC president Mengga Mikui in an op-ed in sematongexpress, a blog.

Pointing out that native customs were administered by the Native Court, he said: “This clearly and expressly make those customs part of the laws of Sarawak.”

Pemakai menoa (territorial domain) and pulau galau (communal forests) land have been regularly litigated and decided in the Native Court.

The Federal Court ruled on Tuesday last week that Adat did not have the force of law on pemakai menoa and pulau galau. It held that these were incidental to temuda (cultivated land). Read more