How Malaysian, Indonesian anti-terror cops take the fight to Islamic militants, foil plots

Source: Asian Correspondent

Malaysian Pasukan Gerak Khas (PGK) elite police operatives moving crosshairs during a Close Quarters Combat drill. Image via @Wikipedia Commons.  Image taken from Asian Correspondent.

Malaysian Pasukan Gerak Khas (PGK) elite police operatives moving crosshairs during a Close Quarters Combat drill. Image via @Wikipedia Commons. Image taken from Asian Correspondent.

WHILE authorities around the world grapple with thwarting attacks by Muslim militants, counter-terrorism units in both Malaysia and Indonesia have been lauded for curbing dozens of bombing plots and assault attempts aimed at killing scores of innocents.

This year alone, Malaysian anti-terrorism police nabbed more than 115 people with links to global Islamist militant groups, preventing at least 14 attempted attacks, while their counterparts in neighbouring Indonesia — also a Muslim-majority country — had foiled at least 15 suicide attacks and bombing plots, with more than 150 arrests, according to various news reports.

Earlier this month, Malaysian police Special Branch (SB) Counter Terrorism Division principal assistant director Ayob Khan Mydin Pitchay, told a seminar on countering extremism at the University of Jordan that the majority of the Malaysian public were unaware of the looming threat of the Islamic State (IS) militants who had planned a series of attacks in his country.

Unlike many countries in Europe, Malaysia has yet to face any major attacks in recent memory, but Ayub Khan said the June 28 grenade attack on an entertainment centre in Puchong in the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur that left eight injured, was a wake up call on the imminent presence of IS.

“Many did not believe that the IS threat is clear and present. I have been talking about IS since 2013, but only after the bombing in Puchong did they (the public) believe it,” Ayob Khan was quoted as saying by national news agency Bernama. Read more

“Tangkap MO1” students take Universiti Malaya to court

Source: NST Online

Four UM students who were found guilty of participating in the "Tangkap MO1" rally held in Aug, initiated legal action to challenge the validity of university's disciplinary rules today, pic by Khairah N. Karim for NST.

Four UM students who were found guilty of participating in the “Tangkap MO1” rally held in Aug, initiated legal action to challenge the validity of university’s disciplinary rules today, pic by Khairah N. Karim for NST.

KUALA LUMPUR: Four Universiti Malaya (UM) students, who were found guilty of participating in the “Tangkap MO1” rally held in Aug, initiated legal action to challenge the validity of the university’s disciplinary rules today.

Students Anis Syafiqah Md Yusof, 24, Mohamad Luqman Nul Haqim Zul Razali, 23, Suhail Wan Azhar, 22, and Muhammad Luqman Hakim Mohd Fazli, 22, filed an originating summons seeking a declaration that UM’s (Discipline of Students) Rules 1999 is unconstitutional. In their action, they are requesting a proclamation that Section 15 (3)(b) of the Universities and University Colleges Act 1971; and Regulations 3 and 13 of the UM (Discipline of Students) Rules, which do not prohibit students from exercising their right to freedom of speech and expression and to participate in demonstrations, have contravened Article 10 (2) of the Federal Constitution. Read more

NGO asks if Federal Court overlooked Native Court

Source: FMT News

NGO says native customs in Borneo have been recognised as a parallel legal system under the Native Court, through the Native Court Ordinance. Pic form FMT News.

NGO says native customs in Borneo have been recognised as a parallel legal system under the Native Court, through the Native Court Ordinance. Pic form FMT News.

KUCHING: The Dayak National Congress (DNC), an NGO, said the Federal Court appears to be unaware that native customs are recognised as “a parallel legal system, apart, for civil law”.

This was provided under the Native Court, through the Native Court Ordinance, said DNC president Mengga Mikui in an op-ed in sematongexpress, a blog.

Pointing out that native customs were administered by the Native Court, he said: “This clearly and expressly make those customs part of the laws of Sarawak.”

Pemakai menoa (territorial domain) and pulau galau (communal forests) land have been regularly litigated and decided in the Native Court.

The Federal Court ruled on Tuesday last week that Adat did not have the force of law on pemakai menoa and pulau galau. It held that these were incidental to temuda (cultivated land). Read more

Finally free from ‘abuse’ after 10 years, children may now lose their home

Source: The Malay Mail Online

The girls at the Caring Hands home in Ipoh talk about their decade-long abuse under the previous caretakers. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa for the MMO.

The girls at the Caring Hands home in Ipoh talk about their decade-long abuse under the previous caretakers. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa for the MMO.

IPOH, Dec 27 — After enduring physical and mental abuse for about 10 years while living in a home for underprivileged children, a group of 12 girls finally spoke up. But now they are in danger of losing the very home that has given them some semblance of normalcy… despite the alleged abuse.

The girls, aged between seven to 18, live in Kaakum Karangal (Tamil for “Caring Hands”) located in the middle-class Lim Garden neighbourhood of Ipoh.

They study at the Tarcisian Convent primary and secondary schools which are just walking distance away and largely regarded as one of Ipoh’s more prominent schools.

The home, established in 2002, is funded by the Society of Caring Hands Ipoh, an NGO comprising successful and respected Indian businessmen, retired top civil servants, and other highly-regarded professionals from Ipoh.

But earlier this year, an unexpected turn of events caused the previously passive members of the society to look closely at how the home was run, which later brought to light allegations of both physical and mental abuse. Read more