Activist’s daughter fights back, claims Malaysians living in fear

Source: FMT News

Sharifah Fareena says her mother's arrest shows that freedom of speech and expression are not accepted in Malaysia. Pic from FMT News.

Sharifah Fareena says her mother’s arrest shows that freedom of speech and expression are not accepted in Malaysia. Pic from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Environmentalist Shariffa Sabrina Syed Akil’s daughter has spoken up against her mother’s arrest, calling it another form of injustice.

Sharifah Fareena Syed Yusof in a statement posted by Sabrina on her Facebook, said she was saddened by the incident that saw her mother locked up for three days, and decided to fight back against those who condemned activists that are speaking for the voiceless. Read more

So what’s that about human rights? — Boo Su-Lyn

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Boo Su-Lyn is a feminist who loves reading fiction. She tweets at @boosulyn. Pic from the MMO.

Boo Su-Lyn is a feminist who loves reading fiction. She tweets at @boosulyn. Pic from the MMO.

DECEMBER 30 ― This year has seen widespread human rights violations in Malaysia, including attacks on freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, native rights, and the right to privacy.

The government appears to be increasingly intolerant of dissent and resorted to investigating trivial matters like the posting of “insulting” photos of leaders on WhatsApp, posting a video of a press conference, and various Facebook posts and tweets.

If Malaysia is serious about achieving developed nation status by 2020, then the government must acknowledge and respect basic human rights like freedom of speech and freedom of assembly. Without the space to express ideas and opinions, society cannot progress.

These are the top 8 human rights violations in the country in 2016, in no particular order: Read more

Nobel laureates criticise Aung San Suu Kyi, urge UN to intervene in Myanmar’s Rohingya crisis

Source: The Malay Mail Online

23 Nobel laureates, politicians, philanthropists and activists criticised Myanmar’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi (pic) for what they called a lack of initiative to protect the Rohingyas. — Reuters pic.

23 Nobel laureates, politicians, philanthropists and activists criticised Myanmar’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi (pic) for what they called a lack of initiative to protect the Rohingyas. — Reuters pic.

NEW YORK, Dec 30 — More than a dozen Nobel laureates yesterday urged the United Nations to “end the human crisis” of Myanmar’s Rohingya minority group, whose members have been fleeing to Bangladesh to escape a bloody military crackdown.

In an open letter addressed to the UN Security Council, 23 Nobel laureates, politicians, philanthropists and activists said “a human tragedy amounting to ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity is unfolding in Myanmar.”

They also criticised the country’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi — herself a Nobel Peace Prize winner — for what they called a lack of initiative to protect the Rohingyas. Read more