Parliament removes mandatory death penalty for drug offences, judges to get discretion

Source: Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 30 — An amendment to the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952 was passed today to remove the mandatory death penalty for drug offences and to instead give judges full discretion in sentencing.

The amendments were passed on the last day of the current Dewan Rakyat meeting via a majority voice vote after Putrajaya altered a provision in the amendment bill that was criticised by Opposition members and the Bar Council.

Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Seri Azalina Othman tabled an alteration to the bill to give full discretion to judges in sentencing drug convicts.

The previous version of the amendment bill said that the judge could only exercise their discretion if the Public Prosecutor issued a certificate declaring that the convict had cooperated with authorities. Read more

Dealing with discrimination — Syahredzan Johan

Source: The Star Online

BY SHAHREDZAN JOHAN

Syahredzan Johan is a young lawyer and partner of a legal firm in Kuala Lumpur. Pic taken from the Star.

Syahredzan Johan is a young lawyer and partner of a legal firm in Kuala Lumpur. Pic taken from the Star.

Our Constitution prohibits discrimination against citizens, but it applies to the public sector only.

IT was recently reported that frontline staff working in certain hotels are forbidden to wear the headscarf (hijab).

Many have criticised the “hijab ban”, stating that the practice is discriminatory.

According to the president of the Malaysian Association of Hotels, the hijab ban is not discriminatory but the standard operating procedure (SOP) in the industry. It was also said that this is a “uniform policy” that has been in practice in international hotel chains for a long time.

The donning of the hijab is generally believed to be in accordance with the religious beliefs of Muslims. A Muslim woman who wears the hijab does so usually because of her faith. Read more