Five steps to beat and survive getting harassed online

Source: Written by Anith Adilah for the Malay Mail Online

Computer screen displaying toolkit

The Cyber-Harassment Survivor’s Toolkit was launched through its PeopleACT initiative on December 31 last year. Image via Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 16 —  For victims of cyber harassment, it is easy to feel helpless and vulnerable, or even to sink into loneliness and despair.

The spiral can be dangerous, even deadly, with instances of suicides stemming from bullying becoming ever more frequent.

The Malaysian Centre for Constitutionalism and Human Rights (MCCHR) aims to ensure victims would never feel that way again, with its Cyber-Harassment Survivor’s Toolkit launched through its PeopleACT initiative on December 31 last year.

Pooling resources from over 500 respondents and 17 cyber harassment survivors, the toolkit includes, among others, a step-by-step guideline to help victims overcome and survive cyber harassments.

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Investigate journos’ sexual harassment claims, says Zuraida

Source: Free Malaysia Today

PETALING JAYA: PKR Wanita chief Zuraida Kamaruddin today urged the police to investigate claims by two female journalists that they had been sexually harassed by politicians, saying the allegations involve abuse of power and breach of trust.

She was referring to a report by the Asian Correspondent yesterday which highlighted the accounts of women journalists who said they had experienced unwanted sexual advances from the male politicians they were assigned to interview.

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In Selangor, another stateless child awaits citizenship to attend school

Source: Written by A. Ruban for Malay Mail Online

Thevasegamani speaking at press conference

Thevasegamani (centre) speaking during a press conference in Klang, January 15, 2018. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa from Malay Mail Online

KLANG, Jan 15 — A father is at his wit’s end after the Selangor Education Department purportedly informed him that his 13-year-old daughter will not be able to attend school until she sorts out her citizenship status.

The girl’s estranged mother is an Indonesian citizen and the father, P. Thevasegamani had apparently registered her as a non-Malaysian citizen when she was born.

Thevasegamani claimed the National Registration Department (NRD) had also told him the same thing as the state education department.

But his daughter had attended public school until standard six despite having a non-Malaysian birth certificate.

“I am not sure what seems to be the problem now. My daughter was born in Klang in 2005 but because her mother is not a Malaysian citizen, we were told to register my girl as a non-Malaysian citizen.

“I paid a levy of RM120 to enrol her at a Tamil school here, but now the (state) education department is telling me get a passport for my daughter in order to go to a secondary school,” he told Malay Mail.

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Planting seeds of hope for elderly, homeless transgenders

Source: Written by Low Han Shaun for The Malaysian Insight

People at The Seed Transgender Home for the elderly

The Seed Transgender Home for the elderly, the first of its kind in Malaysia, can house a maximum of 10 people. – The Malaysian Insight pic by Kamal Ariffin, January 15, 2018.

FROM the time she discovered she was “different” at the age of 17, transgender Alice (not her real name) was prepared for a life alone, and was intent on ensuring she would be financially independent.

However, after working as a chef for 30 years, Alice finds herself today penniless, riddled with sickness and homeless at 50, after she was thrown out of her family home last year.

“I am 50 years old now, I have hepatitis C, heart problems and kidney problems from an accident that I had in 1996,” she said.

“My mother died last year, and my father died when I was 15,” she said, adding that after her mother’s death, her brother sold the family home, forcing her to become homeless.

Alice slept on the streets of Kuala Lumpur for a year before she found out about Seed Transgender Home for the elderly, the first of its kind in Malaysia.

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Gerrymandering, cheating still evident in second redelineation proposal, says Bersih

Source: Written by Bede Hong for The Malaysian Insight

Bersih chairman Maria Chin Abdullah says it is clear the Election Commission wishes to get the electoral delineation proposal passed before the general election, which accounts for its rushing the process when it has until September to complete it. – The Malaysian Insight file pic, January 15, 2018.

THE second redelineation proposal for Selangor’s electoral boundaries, which was released by the Election Commission today, still contains elements of malapportionment and gerrymandering.

Electoral watchdog Bersih 2.0 said although fewer seats would be affected by the proposed electoral boundary changes, the commission did not address existing distortions in voter representation.

“Our preliminary analysis shows that the EC has reversed most of its proposed changes in the first display,” Bersih chairman Maria Chin Abdullah said when contacted today.

“However, issues of malapportionment and gerrymandering still exist. The EC has not corrected these problems,” she said.

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