Amnesty: Malaysia 10th biggest executioner in the world

Source: FMT News

Amnesty International's Death Sentence and Executions Report shows nine people executed and 36 sentenced to death in the country last year. Pic from FMT News.

Amnesty International’s Death Sentence and Executions Report shows nine people executed and 36 sentenced to death in the country last year. Pic from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Malaysia was listed as the 10th biggest executioner last year out of all the countries which carried out capital punishment, Amnesty International Malaysia (AI-Malaysia) says.

AI-Malaysia executive director Shamini Darshni Kaliemuthu said the statistics on the number of executions was not provided by the government in 2015.

“The home ministry had confirmed nine executions in 2016. The number of executions carried out last year appears to represent a considerable increase compared with previous years,” she said during an Amnesty International media briefing on Death Sentences and Executions Report 2016, here, today.

In the report released globally today, it was noted that aside from the nine people executed, at least 36 people were sentenced to death in Malaysia.

Shamini said the home ministry had finally revealed in a Parliamentary reply in October last year that Malaysia had executed six people in 2014, one in 2015 and nine in 2016. Read more

Death penalty should be abolished, says Baru

Source: Borneo Post

Baru Bian, Pic from Borneo Post.

Baru Bian, Pic from Borneo Post.

KUCHING: State PKR chairman Baru Bian wholeheartedly agrees with the call by human rights advocates that capital punishment be removed for all crimes currently punishable by death.

According to him, imposing of the death penalty was believed to act as a deterrent against crime but there is no conclusive evidence that capital punishment is an effective deterrent.

“Those who are about to commit crimes do not stop and sit down to weigh the consequences if they are caught, especially those who commit murder.

“I believe most people do not even know what the penalties are for various crimes except for drug trafficking as that is well-publicised, but even that does not have any deterrent effect, judging from the unabating illegal drug activities in this country,” Baru said in a press statement yesterday.

Baru, who is Ba Kelalan assemblyman, said while capital punishment does not give the offender the chance to be rehabilitated, he believed that people can change, and there are many offenders who do change.

“Whether it is through spiritual input, professional counselling or even the ageing process, many former criminals have changed their attitudes towards crime and emerged as reformed individuals. Read more

Be bold and abolish death penalty, government told

Source: FMT News 

Human rights advocates urge that capital punishment be removed not just for drug trafficking offences, but for all crimes currently punishable by death. Pic from FMT News.

Human rights advocates urge that capital punishment be removed not just for drug trafficking offences, but for all crimes currently punishable by death. Pic from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Human rights groups have urged the government to be bold and abolish the mandatory death penalty in its entirety.

In applauding the Cabinet decision to amend Section 39(B) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952 to include a clause providing discretionary powers to the courts in sentencing drug traffickers, they said capital punishment was not right.

Amnesty International, Lawyers for Liberty and Suara Rakyat Malaysia all agreed that there was no evidence to show the death penalty reduced crime.

They called on the government to make the anticipated removal of the mandatory death penalty for drug offences the first step towards complete abolition of that particular form of punishment.

“Malaysia is one of some 30 countries that still use the death penalty, including mandatory death penalty, which remains one of the most abhorrent methods of punishing crime,” said Amnesty International Malaysia executive director Shamini Darshini. Read more

Judges may be allowed more discretion in sentencing drug traffickers

Source: The Star Online

THE Cabinet has agreed to review the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952 to allow judges to use their discretion in senten­cing offenders instead of imposing the mandatory death sentence.

Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Seri Azalina Othman Said said the review will enable judges to mete suitable sentences in marginal cases where offenders could be given jail sentences.

Azalina said the review was presented to the Cabinet on March 1 by Attorney-General Tan Sri Mohamed Apandi Ali.

“The Cabinet has agreed to an amendment of Section 39(B) of theDangerous Drugs Act 1952 to include the additional clause to provide discretionary powers to the courts when sentencing, apart from the mandatory death penalty, for drug trafficking. Read more