Over 10,000 Sabah natives get titles to customary land

Source: FMT News

KOTA KINABALU: The Sabah government has issued 72 communal grants totalling 48,212ha of land in 213 villages benefiting 10,462 people since the introduction of the land ownership system for landless natives in 2012.

Of the number, 13 communal grants covering 34,426ha in 90 villages benefiting 3,993 people have been developed through joint ventures between the beneficiaries and state agencies or private companies.

Sabah chief minister Musa Aman disclosed this in replying to Wilfred Bumburing (PCS (-Tamparuli) in the state assembly today.

Communal grants are issued to protect the rights of Sabah natives to customary land. The land cannot be sold. Read more

Orang asli seek Suhakam inquiry over encroachment

Source: The Star Online

KUALA LUMPUR: The Temiar orang asli of Gua Musang have applied to the Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) to conduct an enquiry into the Kelantan government over the encroachment of the contentious forest.

The Kelantan Network of Orang Asli Villages committee member Maya Bah Said said the move was aimed at stopping the encroachment into their customary land and the granting of temporary occupation licences and state leases to various companies, including loggers.

He said that the encroachments dating back to 2000 were now just metres away from their villages and polluting their water reserves.

The group also sought a moratorium on logging in the Balah forest reserve pending resolution of the enquiry. Read more

Rights of the natives — Tricia Yeoh

Source: The Sun Daily

A group of Orang Asli block a road in Kampung Sungai Peralong, Gua Musang to protest against timber logging activities in the area on Oct 29, 2016. — Bernama

A group of Orang Asli block a road in Kampung Sungai Peralong, Gua Musang to protest against timber logging activities in the area on Oct 29, 2016. — Bernama

A VIDEO went viral at the end of November on social media, portraying the Temiar Orang Asli community singing Negaraku as the blockade they had set up to protest logging at a forest reserve in Gua Musang in September was destroyed. Several orang asli villagers were also detained as a result of the incident.

This particular action was ordered by the Kelantan State Forestry Department, while a representative of the Kelantan state government stated that all logging activities in Kelantan since 1978 had complied with the law and urged all parties to comply with set regulations.

The orang asli in Malaysia despite being natives and therefore technically part of the bumiputra community have, unfortunately, not quite benefited from the country’s affirmative action policies. A United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) 2014 report revealed that almost 34% of orang asli households live in poverty, this despite official country figures that say 0.6% of the population live below the national poverty line. Why the disenfranchised community? Has the government not paid enough attention to their woes? Read more