Detained Turkish men to meet lawyers and families

Source: FMT News

Lawyer for Turgay Karaman and Ismet Ozcelik, arrested under Sosma, says he will meet them before family are given some time with the detainees. Ismet Ozcelik (left) and Turgay Karaman. Pic from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Turkish citizens Turgay Karaman, Ihsan Aslan and Ismet Ozcelik, who were arrested by the police last week, will get to see their families today.

According to their lawyers, the police had granted them a meeting with Karaman, Ozcelik and Aslan in Bukit Aman police headquarters this morning.

“The families were also told to be at Bukit Aman at 11.30am, though the police said the families will only get to see the detainees at 2pm,” said Rosli Dahlan, who represents Karaman and Ozcelik.

Aslan’s wife, Ainnurul Aisyah Yunos Ali Maricar, said she was grateful and excited over the opportunity to meet with her husband. Read more

Malaysia: Longtime Turkish Residents Detained

Source: Human Rights Watch

(Kuala Lumpur) – Malaysian authorities on May 2, 2017, detained without charge two Turkish nationals who are longtime Kuala Lumpur residents, Human Rights Watch said today. The authorities should provide the basis for holding the men – Turgay Karaman, the principal of Time International School in Ipoh, and Ihsan Aslan, a Kuala Lumpur-based businessman – and allow them full access to legal counsel and contact with their families.

On May 3, Malaysia’s inspector general of police, Khalid Abu Bakar, tweeted that police were holding the men on suspicion of national security offenses under article 130 of Malaysia’s penal code, relating to harboring or assisting a “prisoner of State.” But at a news conference the next day, Khalid said the two were being held under the Security Offences (Special Measures) Act (SOSMA), an administrative detention law. Read more

Malaysia extends controversial security law that allows for 28 days of detention without charge

Source: South East Asia Globe

Bersih Chairman Maria Chin Abdullah looks on during the Bersih 5.0 rally press conference at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 17 November 2016. She was arrested and detained under SOSMA the following day. Photo by Fazry Ismail for EPA.

Bersih Chairman Maria Chin Abdullah looks on during the Bersih 5.0 rally press conference at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 17 November 2016. She was arrested and detained under SOSMA the following day. Photo by Fazry Ismail for EPA.

Malaysia’s House of Representatives voted to extend the law for 5 years amid a debate over whether it’s a necessary tool to combat terrorism or an aggressive assault on civil liberties.

Malaysian authorities will be allowed to detain individuals suspected of committing “security offences” for 28 days without charge until at least mid-2022, after the House of Representatives, or Dewan Rakyat, voted in favour of extending a controversial security law last night.

Deputy Home Minister Nur Jazlan Mohamed proposed the extension of the sub-section in the country’s Security Offences (Special Measures) Act 2012 (SOSMA), ostensibly to give police more time to carry out thorough investigations.

The house passed the motion with 93 votes in favour and 77 against.

Nur Jazlan argued that while the maximum detention period was 28 days, drawn-out bureaucratic processes meant police really only had 21 days to carry out investigations. Read more