Saifuddin: Putrajaya to sign more UN human rights treaties

Source: Malay Mail

Foreign Minister Datuk Saifuddin Abdullah speaks during a press conference at Wisma Putra in Putrajaya, July 2 2018. Picture by Mukhriz Hazim

PUTRAJAYA, July 2 — The Foreign Affairs Ministry will focus on improving several policies, such as pertaining to human rights, freedom, the environment and sustainable development, said the new Foreign Minister, Datuk Saifuddin Abdullah.

He said the government had pledged to sign six more international human rights conventions and achieve the global 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Saifuddin, who was sworn in today, said that as Asean policies remained the priority, the ministry would also continue to enhance bilateral ties in the region.

“We will continue with our foreign policies and continue our bilateral ties with all countries.

“Neutrality policies will be continued and we are also looking at several improvements in the area of human rights and SDGs,” he told reporters after attending a briefing session with ministry officials here. Read more

Foreign Ministry slams US Human Rights Report on Malaysia

Source: NST Online

(File pix) The United States’ 2015 Human Rights Country Report on Malaysia is based on unsubstantiated information and relies primarily on sources whose objectivity is questionable, says Foreign Ministry. Pix by Ghazali Kori

PUTRAJAYA: The United States’ 2015 Human Rights Country Report on Malaysia is based on unsubstantiated information and relies primarily on sources whose objectivity is questionable.

In a statement today, the Foreign Ministry said the government regretted that the allegations were selectively reflected to impute disrepute on the government.

“The report also didn’t take into consideration the country’s efforts to promote and protect human rights,” it added.

The report was released by the US Department of State as part of its annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices of 195 countries and territories. Read more

As Obama heads to Malaysia, human trafficking stance questioned

Source: The Malaysian Insider

Rohingya people being transported in an immigration truck. There have been concerns by US State Department experts that people who already suffered at the hands of human smugglers and traffickers faced more problems and abuse at Malaysia’s immigration detention facilities. – Reuters pic, November 20, 2015.

Inus Abul Baser, an 18-year-old from Myanmar’s persecuted Rohingya Muslim minority, believed he had escaped the worst when he managed to buy his freedom from human traffickers in Thailand and enter Malaysia in search of security and work.

But within weeks, he was cooped up in a filthy, overcrowded detention centre near the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, squatting or sleeping on the floor in a hall with scores of other men.

During his fourth month, wardens ordered them not to move or talk, he says, and beat them with belts if they did.

“There was no rest. You couldn’t sit or lie down without touching someone else,” he said, pointing to a welt on his forearm that he says he received when a guard beat him for arguing with another detainee over space. Read more