Ilmu Seks: How to get more Malays to talk openly about sex

Source: Malay Mail Online

(From left to right) Shayne Wyatt, Mischa Selamat, Herinza and Mussy Del C pose for a picture after an interview with Malay Mail in Kuala Lumpur. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa via Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, Feb 9 — Medical graduate Shayne Wyatt, 24, first had sex a few years ago and it was also when he caught a sexually transmitted disease (STD).

For a month, he was in pain as he visited several general practitioners, even undergoing the uncomfortable procedure of a colonoscopy — an examination where a probe with camera is inserted into the anal cavity.

And yet, he was misdiagnosed as suffering from a haemorrhoid.

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Enough with ‘pondan’ and other media distortions of transgenders — Eric Paulsen

Source: Free Malaysia Today

BY ERIC PAULSEN

In the latest twist to the ongoing Nur Sajat saga, the well-known cosmetic entrepreneur bemoaned the preoccupation of the Malaysian Islamic Development Department (Jakim) and the public over her gender identity.

“This gender issue… is like the country’s biggest issue,” she wrote in Malay on her Facebook page. She continued: “Should Nur Sajat’s issues really be the topic of conversation in this country? Think about it!”

Despite the public embarrassment, however, Nur Sajat’s story represents an opportunity to start a conversation that has been put off for far too long. Transgender persons in Malaysia are often vilified by means of misrepresentation in the news media.

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Gender identity not determined by genitals, civil societies insist amid Nur Sajat’s test

Source: Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 25 — A coalition of NGOs has slammed the federal Islamic authority over a “gender test” on celebrity entrepreneur Nur Sajat Kamaruzzaman, explaining today that one’s genitals do not determine his or her gender identity.

The groups stressed that nobody should be forced to undergo gender or medical tests to prove their gender identity, and Putrajaya should instead implement meaningful measures to increase understanding and educate government agencies and the public regarding gender identity and gender-based bullying and violence.

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Femme & Queer: Redefining Gender Expression

Facebook event here

What does being femme mean to you? How are queer people breaking the gender binary by embracing their femininity? Whether it’s queer women taking ownership of their femininity or queer men challenging the norm of what being a man should be like, how the celebration of femininity can shape the struggle for fairness and equality? These are just some of the issues that we will be talking about in the third of our “Millennials in Malaysia: Defining Our Generation” chat series.
Joining our conversation are :
1) Thilaga, Justice for Sisters
2) Dhinesha Karthigesu, spoken word poet
3) Cat Brogan, poet, educator, and LGBT event organiser

All are welcome to be part of this conversation on sexuality, gender identity and gender expression. Share your stories and experiences of how your identities intersect with one another. Let us know what is your relationship with femininity. This chat is a safe space for everyone to come together and celebrate the universality of humanity.

Event artwork

Artwork by Lynnie Z, Olaf Hajek from Facebook event page

Putrajaya to outlaw ‘any’ form of workplace discrimination

Source: Malay Mail Online

Women working in an office

Female employees are seen working in an office in Putrajaya. — Reuters pic via Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 19 — The proposed amendment to the Employment Act 1955 prohibits all forms of discrimination at work, the Human Resources Ministry said.

Under the proposed amendment, the Labour director-general may inquire into an employee’s complaint of facing discriminatory treatment from his or her employer in relation to the terms and conditions of employment and issue the employer directives to resolve the matter.

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Whither Malaysia’s #MeToo movement? — Boo Su-Lyn

Source: Malay Mail Online

BY BOO SU LYN

JANUARY 19 ― While the #MeToo movement has brought down powerful American men in Hollywood, politics, and the media, the clarion call against sexual harassment is strangely silent in Malaysia.

#MeToo (or “wo ye shi” [#我也是]) has also failed to take off in China, although a former doctoral student’s sexual assault allegations against a leading computer scientist, who allegedly attacked at least seven other students, have gone viral and led to the professor’s suspension from Beihang University in Beijing.

Actresses in Bollywood and other Indian film industries have also spoken out against sexual harassment that is considered an open secret in Indian cinema.

Malaysian women, however, have yet to widely embrace the #MeToo movement, though several did use the hashtag when it came out several days after allegations of sexual harassment against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein broke last October.

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MAC, Terengganu govt discuss plight of transgender community

Source: The Star

PETALING JAYA: The Malaysian AIDS Council (MAC) held a meeting with the Terengganu state government to discuss the plight of transgender community.

In a statement, MAC deputy secretary-general Elisha Kor Krishnan said a meeting with state executive councillor Ghazali Taib on Monday (Jan 15) was refreshing as they were able to push issues concerning the community.

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The quest for gender equality — Shad Saleem Faruqi

Source: The Star

BY SHAD SALEEM FARUQI

Shad Saleem Faruqi - file pic

Shad Saleem Faruqi – file pic

AT the 2018 Golden Globes Award on Jan 7, Oprah Winfrey, the respected American media personality, delivered a stirring call for “a new day” on the horizon for American women. Her speech made me reflect on the faltering quest for gender equality in our own constitutional democracy.

At the outset, it needs to be acknowledged that the ideal of sex equality is so complex and contradictory that everywhere it is buffeted by currents and cross-currents.

On the positive side, Malaysia has plenty of institutions, laws, principles and policies to secure justice for women.

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NUJ slammed over remedy to ‘predatory politicians’

Source: Written by Michael Murty for Free Malaysia Today

PETALING JAYA: A women’s empowerment group has taken the National Union of Journalists (NUJ) to task for saying that female journalists’ dress preference is one of the reasons they become victims of sexual harassment from politicians.

The Women’s Aid Organisation (WAO) said NUJ’s response was disappointing as it blamed the victim instead of condemning the crime of sexual harassment.

“NUJ should respect what their women members are saying and recognise that it is both endemic and dangerous.

“What is needed is a strong response to protect and support survivors of harassment, otherwise it will continue to be tolerated and regularised in the field,” said WAO executive director Sumitra Visvanathan.

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Five steps to beat and survive getting harassed online

Source: Written by Anith Adilah for the Malay Mail Online

Computer screen displaying toolkit

The Cyber-Harassment Survivor’s Toolkit was launched through its PeopleACT initiative on December 31 last year. Image via Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 16 —  For victims of cyber harassment, it is easy to feel helpless and vulnerable, or even to sink into loneliness and despair.

The spiral can be dangerous, even deadly, with instances of suicides stemming from bullying becoming ever more frequent.

The Malaysian Centre for Constitutionalism and Human Rights (MCCHR) aims to ensure victims would never feel that way again, with its Cyber-Harassment Survivor’s Toolkit launched through its PeopleACT initiative on December 31 last year.

Pooling resources from over 500 respondents and 17 cyber harassment survivors, the toolkit includes, among others, a step-by-step guideline to help victims overcome and survive cyber harassments.

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