Important to widen our view on terror

Source: The Star Online

The bad guys: A file picture of members of the Abu Sayyaf militant group operating in southern Philippines. In 2014, the Abu Sayyaf declared allegiance to the Islamic State. Pic taken from The Star Online.

The bad guys: A file picture of members of the Abu Sayyaf militant group operating in southern Philippines. In 2014, the Abu Sayyaf declared allegiance to the Islamic State. Pic taken from The Star Online.

THERE is nothing Islamic about the so-called “Islamic State militant group” – how many times have we heard this from terror experts, religious scholars and enforcement authorities?

Even Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak has noted that the perverted ideology of IS has no place in Islam.

Unfortunately in Malaysia, we cannot escape from religion in discussions about radicalisation and violent extremism, said Nicholas Chan, research director with Iman Research.

As Chan pointed out at the recent Civil Society Conference on National Security in Kuala Lumpur, this is because Islam is entrenched in our security framework.

“National security in Malaysia has been defined largely in religious terms since the early 1980s (especially with the ulama takeover of PAS after party president Tan Sri Mohamad Asri Muda stepped down).

“And since our security is invariably linked to Islam, any discussion of security threats also goes back to the religion, despite our leaders, like the PM, trying very hard to disassociate Islam from groups like IS,” he said. Read more

Better safe than sorry?

Source: The Star Online

Public protection: Military and police personnel guarding KL Sentral. Pic taken from the Star Online.

Public protection: Military and police personnel guarding KL Sentral. Pic taken from the Star Online.

Civil society groups vow to continue questioning the constitutionality of the newly enacted National Security Council Act 2016.

THE army is trained to kill (in combat). They are not trained to engage civilians….”

Former Royal Malaysian Air Force officer Lt-Col (Rtd) Mohd Daud Sulaiman warned of the dangers of using the military in internal security operations, as provided for by the newly enacted National Security Council (NSC) Act 2016.

“The use of the military in internal security operations must be done with care because the way the military is trained and carries out its business is not the same as other enforcement authorities,” he said.

Mohd Daud was one of the speakers at the Civil Society Conference on National Security in Kuala Lumpur held on 18 August 2016, organised by members of civil society, including Amnesty International Malaysia, the National Human Rights Society (Hakam), Institut Rakyat, Persatuan Promosi Hak Asasi Malaysia (Proham) and Suara Rakyat Malaysia (Suaram). Read more

‘NSC Bill gives dictatorship powers to a desperate politician’ – Institut Rakyat

Source: MalaysiaKini

Source: Mkini

Source: Mkini

Sweeping powers proposed for the prime minister under the National Security Council (NSC) Bill 2015 raises alarm, given the tenuous political standing of Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak, PKR think-tank Institut Rakyat says.

The bill, which allows the NSC to declare a place a “security area” and impose emergency-like conditions, must be pushed through today if it is to be passed by the end of this parliamentary session.

“We should all bear in mind that a caretaker prime minister facing defeat in an election can still activate the powers granted to him by the NSC Bill.

“Without functional institutions of executive accountability, without leadership based on responsibility, Malaysia’s parliamentary democracy is in grave jeopardy,” Institut Rakyat director Yin Shao Loong said in a statement today. Read more