Time is right for fresh GLC reforms, say analysts

Source: FMT News

KUALA LUMPUR: A second wave of reforms is needed for government-linked companies (GLCs) and government-linked investment companies (GLICs), according to a report in The Edge.

This is to help enhance governance standards and to put in place adequate institutional measures to prevent the mismanagement of public resources.

The report quoted Lee Heng Guie, executive director of the Socio-Economic Research Centre (SERC), as saying, “The time has come for a second round of transformations, specifically aimed at improving the governance of GLCs. The management of public funds in carrying out nation-building objectives require greater public scrutiny.

“There is also a need to redefine the role of GLCs in the economy, with a view of ensuring that the limited public financial resources are efficiently managed and invested while not crowding out the private sector. The inefficient ones should be restructured or disposed of.”

In May 2004, the government launched a 10-year initiative called the GLC Transformation Programme, which, among others, revamped sovereign wealth fund Khazanah Nasional Bhd and set higher standards for the management of GLCs. Read more

We must make reform popular — Wan Saiful Wan Jan

Source: The Star Online

BY WAN SAIFUL WAN JAN

It’s all about changing the climate of opinion to fit your vision because politicians and political parties win or lose based on how popular their ideas are.

Wan Saiful Wan Jan - The Star Online file pic

Wan Saiful Wan Jan – The Star Online file pic

JOSEPH Schumpeter, in his book Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, defines democracy as “that institutional arrangement for arriving at political decisions in which individuals acquire the power to decide by means of a competitive struggle for the people’s vote”.

This definition implies that in a democracy there must be competition for votes. This says a lot about the nature of democracy. To win, you must make what you are selling popular. Not necessarily right. But popular.

To see the story of democracy in our country, we need to look back. Since before independence, our society has been divided along communal lines. This was reflected when our political parties were formed. Almost all were communal.

The first president of Umno, Datuk Onn Jaafar, tried to change this. He wanted Umno to open its membership to non-Malays. He embodied the spirit of 1Malaysia before the term was coined.

But he failed and he eventually left Umno. He formed the Independence of Malaya Party and later Parti Negara to pursue his vision for inclusive politics. But, again, he failed.

Onn’s vision was ahead of its time. The public wanted something else, not the good vision that he offered. That is the reality of demo­cracy. Good visions can and do lose the democratic battle if you are un­­able to change the climate of opi­nion to support your vision. Read more

STATEMENT: Dire Need for Institutional Reforms to Uphold the Rule of Law and for Effective Checks and Balances

STATEMENT DATED 18 APRIL 2016

DIRE NEED FOR INSTITUTIONAL REFORMS
TO UPHOLD THE RULE OF LAW AND FOR
EFFECTIVE CHECKS AND BALANCES

1. HAKAM is gravely concerned with the seemingly increasing disregard for the fundamentals of democracy by the Federal Government and key institutions of the nation.

2. That the situation is critical is evident given the increasingly strident and combative tone that the Government and institutions have adopted in dealing with, and rejecting, widespread criticism over the manner in which matters of national importance and public interest have been dealt with. Without intending to define or limit the nature of these matters, HAKAM views with concern the manner in which the following matters have, or have not, been addressed:

2.1 Race relations and increasingly contentious and divisive ethno-religious issues. The direct impact on the social and economic environment can no longer be ignored. It is no coincidence that an increasing number of Malaysians are looking for more fulfilling lives elsewhere;

2.2 The administration of justice. It is no longer possible to brush aside the obvious signs of a significant loss of public confidence in institutions involved in this vital aspect of the democratic framework of this nation. Internationally recognised indexes conclusively show that Malaysia is no longer perceived as a country that upholds the Rule of Law. The efficacy of these public institutions is made possible only by the fact that stakeholders continue to have confidence in them;

2.3 Free and fair elections. This needs no explanation; and

2.4 Corruption and illicit capital out-flow. This has hurt and continues to hurt all Malaysians, irrespective of race, religion and background.

3. The dismissiveness of the Government and its reliance on a legal framework that it has harnessed to suppress legitimate dissent on matters that affect all Malaysians, regardless of their backgrounds and political leanings, clearly point to the interest of the nation having been made subservient to political interests. Read more

STATEMENT: Dire Need for Institutional Reforms to Uphold the Rule of Law and for Effective Checks and Balances

pdfSTATEMENT DATED 18 APRIL 2016

DIRE NEED FOR INSTITUTIONAL REFORMS
TO UPHOLD THE RULE OF LAW AND FOR
EFFECTIVE CHECKS AND BALANCES

 

1. HAKAM is gravely concerned with the seemingly increasing disregard for the fundamentals of democracy by the Federal Government and key institutions of the nation.

2. That the situation is critical is evident given the increasingly strident and combative tone that the Government and institutions have adopted in dealing with, and rejecting, widespread criticism over the manner in which matters of national importance and public interest have been dealt with. Without intending to define or limit the nature of these matters, HAKAM views with concern the manner in which the following matters have, or have not, been addressed:

2.1 Race relations and increasingly contentious and divisive ethno-religious issues. The direct impact on the social and economic environment can no longer be ignored. It is no coincidence that an increasing number of Malaysians are looking for more fulfilling lives elsewhere;

2.2 The administration of justice. It is no longer possible to brush aside the obvious signs of a significant loss of public confidence in institutions involved in this vital aspect of the democratic framework of this nation. Internationally recognised indexes conclusively show that Malaysia is no longer perceived as a country that upholds the Rule of Law. The efficacy of these public institutions is made possible only by the fact that stakeholders continue to have confidence in them;

2.3 Free and fair elections. This needs no explanation; and

2.4 Corruption and illicit capital out-flow. This has hurt and continues to hurt all Malaysians, irrespective of race, religion and background.

3. The dismissiveness of the Government and its reliance on a legal framework that it has harnessed to suppress legitimate dissent on matters that affect all Malaysians, regardless of their backgrounds and political leanings, clearly point to the interest of the nation having been made subservient to political interests. Read more