Suhakam: Govt must uphold rights of Orang Asli, refugees

Source: FMT News

Human rights group chief Razali Ismail criticises those who deny Orang Asli control over their own lands and development based on their own values. Pic form FMT News.

Human rights group chief Razali Ismail criticises those who deny Orang Asli control over their own lands and development based on their own values. Pic form FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: The Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) says equality must be upheld in the country, especially for minorities such as the Orang Asli and refugee communities.

Suhakam chairman Razali Ismail said poverty and vulnerability continue to threaten the Orang Asli despite a clear ruling from the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination classifying discrimination against indigenous people as racial discrimination.

He added that they faced many challenges and that despite government efforts, their human rights were frequently violated.

“The Orang Asli are denied control over their own lands and development based on their own values.

“They have also been the victims of forced displacement due to uncontrolled logging,” he said in a statement released in conjunction with the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination today. Read more

Report: Racial discrimination in Malaysia growing despite Putrajaya’s efforts

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Pusat Komas recommended harsher punishments for individuals, especially politicians, who make racially inciting statements. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng for the MMO.

Pusat Komas recommended harsher punishments for individuals, especially politicians, who make racially inciting statements. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng for the MMO.

PETALING JAYA, March 21 — Discrimination based on the colour of one’s skin seems to be on the rise in Malaysia despite the government’s efforts to promote moderation and racial harmony.

The Racial Discrimination Report 2016 by non-profit social outfit Pusat Komas released tonight found that strained ethnic relations are growing although the National Unity Consultative Council has been working to bolster ties.

“Recent incidents of racial discrimination, racism and stained ethnic relations within the Malaysian society have increasingly surfaced over the years despite the Prime Minister’s numerous assurances and claims at home and abroad that the government promotes moderation in the country,” the report presented by programme coordinator Ryan Chua read.

The report added that the growth of social media has also made the racial divide further with more room for such negative sentiments to be propagated. Read more

Pushing the principles of non-discrimination

Source: Daily Express

Kota Kinabalu: Sabah has what it takes to inspire the Malaysian Government to ratify the International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (ICERD).

The State is already a shining example of racial and religious harmony in the country but human rights bodies believe that the State Government can take it one step further by implementing the principles of non-discrimination in the administration of the State.

A close-door roundtable discussion, jointly organised by Pusat Komunikasi Masyarakat (Komas) and Suhakam, was held on Thursday, which aimed to engage stakeholders in the State Government to promote the implementation of the ICERD principles.

Organisers hoped the engagement could be treated as a commitment by the State Government to present itself a model government in eradicating race-based politics and reduce racial discrimination in Malaysia.

Malaysia is one of 15 out of 175 United Nations member countries that are not yet party to the ICERD, including North Korea, Myanmar and a dozen authoritarian countries.

Of the seven UN treaties, Malaysia has ratified three, namely the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol (CRPD).

Suhakam, however, believes that the country is ready to ratify the ICERD, although it has had to deal with many issues concerning racial and religious discriminations. Read more

Enact anti-discrimination, hate speech laws, Suhakam urges Putrajaya

Source: The Malay Mail Online

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According to Cenbet’s survey released last week, Malaysians in the peninsular are categorised as ‘average or selectively racist’. — Picture by Choo Choy May

KUALA LUMPUR, March 21 — The Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) today revived calls on the federal government to introduce fresh legislation outlawing hate speech and discrimination, saying the laws were necessary to end racism here.

The commission also urged Putrajaya to accede to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD), an accord that would compel Malaysia to enact such laws in order to eliminate racial discrimination and promote understanding among races.

“Malaysia continues to be confronted with evidence that it is still far from realising the goal of inter-ethnic, racial and religious harmony that our founding fathers had strived to achieve,” Suhakam said in a statement issued in conjunction with the International Elimination of Racial Discrimination Day today. Read more