Forced migration still a big problem in Asia — Puteri Nor Ariane Yasmin

Source: NST Online

BY PUTERI NOR ARIANE YASMIN

This week, there are two significant global meetings that aim to address forced migration — the first-ever United Nations Summit or High-Level Meeting on Refugees and Migrants starting yesterday, and Leaders’ Summit on Refugees today. These events underscore the fact that forced migration has transitioned from a recognised but overlooked global challenge to one that demands urgent action.

Indeed, a survey by the World Economic Forum released in January notes that large-scale forced migration is one of the top risks facing the global economy. The number of people forcibly displaced has hit a post-World War 2 high at 65.3 million, of which 21.3 million are refugees (over half of whom are below 18) and 10 million are stateless. Approximately 34,000 people are forcibly displaced every day, largely due to conflict and persecution in the Middle East and Africa. Read more

Migration: Our policy Black Hole – Lim Teck Ghee

Source: The Heat Malaysia

BY LIM TECK GHEE

Malaysia should get rid of its policy black hole and politicking if it wants to solve our migration problems.

The recent ruckus over the plan to bring in as many as 1.5 million Bangladeshi workers into the country should shine the spotlight not only on the topic of foreign labour in Malaysia but also more crucially, on our migration policy.

In any country especially one with relatively open and porous borders – whether it is first, second or third world; developing or developed – one would expect that a national migration policy would receive priority attention, and be placed at the forefront of public policy and attention.

Such a policy would be accompanied by transparent disclosure of what the targets of that migration policy are, whether these targets have been met, and whether there needs to be refinements or changes to policy implementation.

Details of the policy would be published on a regular basis to enable all stakeholders to scrutinize and monitor the policy, and provide feedback to policy makers. Read more

Eight years on, a Myanmar Chin family in Malaysia seeks a new home

Source: The Malay Mail Online

The family in their rented room without the eldest, teenage son. — Picture by Melissa Chin

The family in their rented room without the eldest, teenage son. — Picture by Melissa Chin

KUALA LUMPUR, June 20 — Cung Cung was six years old when he made the week-long journey from Myanmar’s Chin state to Malaysia all by himself.

Now all of 10, he barely remembers that trip and has only a hazy memory of his home.

“I remember we have a big garden, and there is a field near our house where I played football with my friends,” he said after a pause, his eyebrows knit and with finger on his chin.

Now Cung Cung has his family with him again. The family that was split apart in 2007 when father Obed initiated their migration, became complete when Cung Cung’s younger sibling joined them in 2011. Read more

How to solve the Asian migrant boats crisis – expert views

Source: The Guardian

Migrants believed to have come from Burma and Bangladesh on an abandoned boat drifting in the Andaman Sea close. Photo: STR/EPA

Migrants believed to have come from Burma and Bangladesh on an abandoned boat drifting in the Andaman Sea close. Photo: STR/EPA

With up to 8000 desperate people – Rohingya Muslims from Burma and economic migrants from Bangladesh – stranded in boats in the Andaman Sea, experts call for an urgent regional, humanitarian response.

Between 6,000 and 8,000 refugees, asylum seekers and economic migrants from Burma and Bangladesh are currently stranded in boats off the coasts of Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia, with the governments of all three nations refusing to allow the boats to land. With reports of deaths on board and thousands more lives at risk, the Guardian asked a panel of experts how the crisis could be solved.

Read more