Criminologist: Beating soles illegal, used by dictatorial regimes

Source: FMT News

Expert says hitting on the soles of the feet is a form of torture used to extract information and is effective as it leaves no mark, hence abuse cannot be proven. Pic from FMT News.

PETALING JAYA: Beating at the sole of the feet is an unauthorised and illegal form of punishment in Malaysia and an absolute no-no under international norms, according to a criminologist.

Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Associate Prof P Sundramoorthy said such beatings create some of the most “excruciating and intense pains” without leaving any physical scars as evidence.

“It is one of the most painful tactics used without leaving any marks. If a complainant files a police report about such abuse, he or she may not be able to provide evidence as the skin beneath the feet is thick. Read more

Tahfiz school ignores angry netizens over student’s death

Source: The Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, May 2 ― A Johor religious school said it did not have to entertain public outrage on the internet over a student’s beating by an assistant warden that allegedly resulted in the amputation of his legs and death.

The management of Madrasah Tahfiz Al-Jauhar (MTAJ), a school based in Kota Tinggi that teaches memorisation of the Quran, also said the word “abuse” might not accurately depict the situation.

“MTAJ does not have to entertain netizens who are too full of suspicion because 97 per cent of them have never dealt with MTAJ and are only talking and writing based on perceptions and sentiments that have been played up,” MTAJ management said on its Facebook page yesterday.

Screenshot of the Faceook Post made by the Madrasah Tahfiz Al-Jauhar (MTAJ.)

“MTAJ will take all suggestions into account for further action. MTAJ only needs to apologise to netizens for our inability to answer all questions,” it added. Read more

Another student claims abuse in religious school

Source: The Star Online

Painful experience: Suraya Fatima (left) showing Muhammad Resan’s scars to lawyer Gerard Lazarus during the press conference in Klang. Looking on is the boy’s father, M.D. Ekramul. Pic from the Star Online.

Painful experience: Suraya Fatima (left) showing Muhammad Resan’s scars to lawyer Gerard Lazarus during the press conference in Klang. Looking on is the boy’s father, M.D. Ekramul. Pic from the Star Online.

KLANG: Another case of a beating in a religious school has surfaced with an 11-year-old boy claiming an ustaz (religious teacher) in a private religious boarding school had abused him and threatened him with more punishment if he complained to his parents.

“He also said my brain would not be able to memorise the Quran if I complained about an ustaz,” said Muhammad Resan Abdullah.

The ustaz has since been charged in court but after reading about the fate that had be­fallen Mohamad Thaqif Amin Mohd Gadaffi, his parents engaged a lawyer yesterday to re-examine the case. Read more

Unicef urges corporal punishment ban, in light of Thaqif’s death

Source: FMT News

It's a misperception that physical punishment is the only way to instil discipline among children, says Unicef spokesperson in Malaysia. Pic from FMT News.

It’s a misperception that physical punishment is the only way to instil discipline among children, says Unicef spokesperson in Malaysia. Pic from FMT News.

KUALA LUMPUR: The United Nations Children’s Fund (Unicef) has joined in the nationwide grief over the death of 11-year-old Mohamad Thaqif Amin Mohd Gaddafi, saying the incident underlines the need to ban corporal punishment in schools.

“The loss of Mohamad Thaqif to his family, school and society is a stark reminder of the negative consequences of corporal punishment and violence as a form of discipline,” said spokesperson for Unicef in Malaysia, Marianne Clark-Hattingh.

She said there were more effective methods which are “non-violent” to discipline children. Read more

Corporal punishment must stop, Suhakam tells govt after schoolboy dies

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Razali insisted on mandatory background checks for all school hires and expressed disbelief that there are no legal procedures for schools to check on potential staff before they are allowed to work with children. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng for the MMO.

Razali insisted on mandatory background checks for all school hires and expressed disbelief that there are no legal procedures for schools to check on potential staff before they are allowed to work with children. — Picture by Saw Siow Feng for the MMO.

KUALA LUMPUR, April 27 — Outraged by the death of 11-year-old Mohamad Thaqif Amin Mohd Gadaffi yesterday, the Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) wants the government to abolish corporal punishment in schools.

Its chairman Tan Sri Razali Ismail reminded the government that corporal punishments violate the Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC) because the violent measures damage a child physically, mentally and emotionally.

“This tragic case is a horrendous reminder to the Government that corporal punishment in schools must be eliminated because any form of physical violence against a child negatively impacts on the enjoyment of the child’s many other rights and aspects of the child’s development including his/her psychological, health, education and social status,” he said in a statement today.

Malaysia ratified the CRC in 1995.

Razali noted that prior to his death, the student of the private Islamic boarding school in Kota Tinggi, Johor was allegedly repeatedly physically punished, including a beating with a rubber hose by the dormitory assistant warden who was a former convict. Read more

Assistant warden had them cowering

Source: The Star

An assistant warden of the dormitory of a religious school is remanded to facilitate investigations into a child abuse case involving a student, April 23, 2017. — Bernama pic.

An assistant warden of the dormitory of a religious school is remanded to facilitate investigations into a child abuse case involving a student, April 23, 2017. — Bernama pic.

KOTA TINGGI: The mere mention of his name sent shivers down the spine of the students at the religious school.

The man who allegedly beat Mo­­hamad Thaqif Amin Mohd Gadaffi, until the 11-year-old boy died, is said to be a very violent man who had all the students cowering in fear.

A student at the school who did not want to be named, said the assistant warden was very fierce.

The boy expressed shock when told that the assistant warden was a former convict who had spent 30 months in jail for theft.

About 30 students from the school came to pay their last respects to their friend Mohamad Thaqif at his grandparents’ house in Felda Bukit Aping Timur where the funeral was held. Read more

Death of tahfiz student: Education Ministry leaves investigation to police

Source: The Sun Daily

Mohamad Thaqif Amin

Mohamad Thaqif Amin

KUALA LUMPUR: The Education Ministry has left it to the police to carry out a full investigation into the death of a tahfiz (religious school) student who was allegedly beaten up by an assistant hostel warden at the school.

It’s minister, Datuk Seri Mahdzir Khalid said although the school was not registered under the ministry, the issue was still deemed as related to the country’s education institution.

“We extend our condolences to the family of the student involved. Although I was made to understand that the school is not registered, it is still an education institution that has students and teachers.

“This matter is certainly beyond our expectation because it involves a heavy offence…We leave it (the matter) to the police,” he said when met by Bernama after the UMNO Supreme Council meeting at Menara Dato Onn here yesterday.

Mohamad Thaqif Amin, 11, whose legs were amputated on Friday to prevent infection, died at 2.05pm at the Sultan Ismail Hospital in Johor Baru today, where he had sought treatment. Read more