Important to widen our view on terror

Source: The Star Online

The bad guys: A file picture of members of the Abu Sayyaf militant group operating in southern Philippines. In 2014, the Abu Sayyaf declared allegiance to the Islamic State. Pic taken from The Star Online.

The bad guys: A file picture of members of the Abu Sayyaf militant group operating in southern Philippines. In 2014, the Abu Sayyaf declared allegiance to the Islamic State. Pic taken from The Star Online.

THERE is nothing Islamic about the so-called “Islamic State militant group” – how many times have we heard this from terror experts, religious scholars and enforcement authorities?

Even Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak has noted that the perverted ideology of IS has no place in Islam.

Unfortunately in Malaysia, we cannot escape from religion in discussions about radicalisation and violent extremism, said Nicholas Chan, research director with Iman Research.

As Chan pointed out at the recent Civil Society Conference on National Security in Kuala Lumpur, this is because Islam is entrenched in our security framework.

“National security in Malaysia has been defined largely in religious terms since the early 1980s (especially with the ulama takeover of PAS after party president Tan Sri Mohamad Asri Muda stepped down).

“And since our security is invariably linked to Islam, any discussion of security threats also goes back to the religion, despite our leaders, like the PM, trying very hard to disassociate Islam from groups like IS,” he said. Read more

Better safe than sorry?

Source: The Star Online

Public protection: Military and police personnel guarding KL Sentral. Pic taken from the Star Online.

Public protection: Military and police personnel guarding KL Sentral. Pic taken from the Star Online.

Civil society groups vow to continue questioning the constitutionality of the newly enacted National Security Council Act 2016.

THE army is trained to kill (in combat). They are not trained to engage civilians….”

Former Royal Malaysian Air Force officer Lt-Col (Rtd) Mohd Daud Sulaiman warned of the dangers of using the military in internal security operations, as provided for by the newly enacted National Security Council (NSC) Act 2016.

“The use of the military in internal security operations must be done with care because the way the military is trained and carries out its business is not the same as other enforcement authorities,” he said.

Mohd Daud was one of the speakers at the Civil Society Conference on National Security in Kuala Lumpur held on 18 August 2016, organised by members of civil society, including Amnesty International Malaysia, the National Human Rights Society (Hakam), Institut Rakyat, Persatuan Promosi Hak Asasi Malaysia (Proham) and Suara Rakyat Malaysia (Suaram). Read more

Malaysia: Military Chief’s New Role as Security Council Head May Be Illegal, Critics Say

Source: BenarNews

Zulkifeli Mohd Zin (right), chief of Malaysia’s armed forces, stands next to King Abdul Mu’adzam Shah during an inspection of an honor guard on the king’s official birthday celebration, in Kuala Lumpur, June 8, 2013.

A decision allowing Malaysia’s military chief to run the newly set up National Security Council underscores the government’s seriousness in combating the terrorism threat, officials say, but some experts believe the move violates the constitution and could result in human rights and other abuses.

In a surprise announcement last week, Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi said Malaysian Armed Forces chief Zulkifeli Mohd Zin had taken over as National Security Council director-general as part of tough new security legislation that came into force about two weeks earlier.

Prime Minister Najib Razak, facing resignation calls after being linked to a multi-million dollar corruption scandal, had pushed the National Security Council Act through parliament in December. After legislative approval, the bill did not get the customary royal assent from Malaysia’s king, who had asked for some changes.

The legislation, among other objectives, enables the government to declare virtual martial law in areas deemed to be under “security threat.” Read more

Chief of Defence Forces is new National Security Council director-general

Source: The Malay Mail Online

Tan Sri Zulkifeli Mohd Zin has been appointed the director-general of the National Security Council. ― File pic

Tan Sri Zulkifeli Mohd Zin has been appointed the director-general of the National Security Council. ― File pic

NEW YORK, Aug 25 ― Taking into account the severity of the threats to national security and defence, the Malaysian government has appointed a military officer as the director-general of the National Security Council, it was announced here yesterday.

Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister and Home Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi, who made the announcement, said Chief of Defence Forces Gen Tan Sri Zulkifeli Mohd Zin has been appointed the first director-general of the council.

It is learnt that Zulkifeli’s appointment took effect on August 15. Up to now the council had a civilian occupying the post of secretary.

“In view of the threats to national security and defence, the government decided that a police or military officer should be in charge of the council,” Ahmad Zahid said at a dinner with officers and staff of the Malaysian Permanent Mission to the United Nations and government agencies operating in New York, at the mission office here.

He also said that more police and military officers with experience in national security and defence matters would be appointed to the council. Read more

NSC Act contravenes powers of the King: Ex-RMAF man

Source: The SunDaily

KUALA LUMPUR, 18 August 2016: The provisions in the National Security Council (NSC) Act 2016 contravenes the powers of the Yang di-Pertuan Agong as it would allow the council to take command of the military.

Former Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) officer Lt Col (Rtd) Mohamad Daud Sulaiman said the Federal Constitution clearly states that the Agong and the royal institution are in command of the military forces.

“If we look at the provisions (in the NSC), it uses a lot of military terms and this is very dangerous.

“One of the explanations given about the NSC by the government is that the Agong does not have operational command of the military,” Mohamad Daud said during a Civil Society Conference on National Security held at the Renaissance Hotel here.

He was referring to the official Putrajaya Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) explanation on the law posted on the NSC’s official website.

Mohamad Daud said Malaysians must be aware of the dangers of allowing the military to enforce legislation passed in Parliament.

“When you ask the military to enforce the law, you ask for trouble. The military is not trained for that. They do not know the Criminal Procedure Code (CPC),” he said. Read more

Suhakam wants mechanism to review NSC Act

Source: FMT News

There’s no mechanism to review any direction or order under the National Security Council Act (NSC Act). Pic taken from FMT News.

There’s no mechanism to review any direction or order under the National Security Council Act (NSC Act). Pic taken from FMT News.

KUALA LUMPUR: It was Benjamin Franklin who said in 1755 that “those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety”, recalled Suhakam Chairman Razali Ismail in the keynote speech at the “Civil Society Conference on National Security” in Kuala Lumpur on Thursday.

Franklin’s simple phrase reminds everyone that the philosophy espoused by both rights and security advocates has been played throughout the centuries countless times, added Razali.

“Actors, be it from the Executive or Legislative, and certainly the participants of this Conference must play their part to ensure the balance does not tilt heavily towards the other end.”

The relationship between national security and human rights should always be in balance, he urged. “This is an important part of the Malaysian ethos.”

Suhakam, he said, advocates a mechanism of review as advocated by the UN’s Special Rapporteur on the “Promotion and Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms while Countering Terrorism”. Read more

NSC Act in contempt of King’s powers, says ex-RMAF man

Source: FMT News

Former Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) officer Lt Col (Rtd) Mohamad Daud Sulaiman says it is not right to empower the council to command the military. Pic taken from FMT News.

Former Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) officer Lt Col (Rtd) Mohamad Daud Sulaiman says it is not right to empower the council to command the military. Pic taken from FMT News.

KUALA LUMPUR: Some parts of the National Security Council (NSC) Act are in contempt of the Yang di-Pertuan Agong’s powers, a former air force officer said today.

Former Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) officer Lt Col (Rtd) Mohamad Daud Sulaiman said: “That is contempt of the institution, an insult.

He was speaking at the Civil Society Conference on National Security here on Wednesday.

Commenting on the impact of the NSC on the military forces, he said it was clearly stated in the Federal Constitution that the King and the Conference of Rulers were in charge of the military.

“If we look at the provisions (in the NSC), it uses a lot of military terms and this is very dangerous,” Daud said.

He said part four of the NSC says the King does not have operational command of the military.

He said this was posted on the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section of the NSC’s official website. Read more

Suhakam willing to advise NSC Council on human rights

Source: Malaysiakini

Razali: 'The unclear definition of security in the Act may also be interpreted to suppress expression of thoughts, opinions or beliefs on public matters, including government policies.' Pic by The Star Online.

Razali: ‘The unclear definition of security in the Act may also be interpreted to suppress expression of thoughts, opinions or beliefs on public matters, including government policies.’ Pic by The Star Online.

Assalamualaikum and good morning to all. It gives me great pleasure to be invited on behalf of the Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) to this Conference on the National Security Council Act 2016 and its Implications on National Security and Human Rights.

The threat and reality of terrorism has grown exponentially and countries throughout the world have been struggling to develop effective responses to ensure their national security is protected. Such violent lethal activities have propelled nations to beef up their security and anti-terror laws. Malaysia too has followed suit, recognising that the rampant terrorism threatens the peace and harmony of the nation encapsulated in our constitution.

However in the process of effecting the nation’s response, the question that must be posed, whether those sweeping actions are in proportional response to the threat posed, or more would think in the process undermine underlying harmony and ethos as encapsulated in our constitution, affecting our individual and social liberties and freedom.

A significant proportion of Malaysians while accepting the need to be vigilant and defend our national security are questioning the enactment in recent years of various security laws such as The Security Offences (Special Measures) Act 2012 (Sosma), Prevention of Terrorism Act 2015 (Pota), and the National Security Council Act 2016 (NSC), amongst others. These security laws are among the critical issues of concern for Suhakam in light of its implications on human rights. Read more

Civil Society Conference on National Security

NSConference

 

 

Keynote Speaker, Civil Society Conference on National Security

Keynote Speaker, Civil Society Conference on National Security

Speakers, Civil Society Conference on National Security

Speakers, Civil Society Conference on National Security

Speakers, Civil Society Conference on National Security

Speakers, Civil Society Conference on National Security

 

Watch the Civil Society Conference on National Security 2016
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4qistxYwmgqA5xbnttkpxaoXNKdWpd5k

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Anwar Ibrahim files suit to stop NSC Act

Source: The Star Online

KUALA LUMPUR: Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim has filed a suit to stop the operation of the National Security Council Act on grounds that it is unconstitutional.

He named the Government and the National Security Council as respondents in his originating summons filed at the High Court civil registry on Tuesday.

Anwar, former Opposition leader, is currently serving a five-year jail term for sodomy at the Sungai Buloh prison.

The suit was filed through his lawyers N.Surendran, R.Sivarasa and Latheefa Koya.