MoH: Custodial medical unit to eventually be extended to smaller lockups, immigration depots

Source: Malay Mail Online

View from outside a prison

The CMU will first be implemented at the Jinjang, Kuala Lumpur centralised lockup before it is extended to other lockups. — Picture by Suhakam via Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 21 — The proposed custodial medical unit (CMU) at centralised lockups will eventually be extended to smaller lockups throughout the country, Deputy Health Director-General (Medical) Datuk Dr S. Jeyaindran has said.

Dr Jeyaindran, who is in charge of medical services said that as a start, resident doctors will be placed at centralised lockups round-the-clock and eventually it will be extended to smaller lockups, the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) lockups as well as Immigration detention centres.

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Lock-ups can’t improve without more money, says Suhakam

Source: FMT News 

PETALING JAYA: The Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (Suhakam) has urged the finance ministry to allocate more funds to improve conditions in detention lock-ups in the country.

Suhakam commissioner Jerald Joseph told FMT that there was little enforcement officers could do without sufficient funding.

“To improve the older lock-ups, you need money to either renovate them or build new ones,” he said.

“Although I know the budget is always tight, I hope that in the coming budget we will see more money being allocated towards this effort.”

Last year, Suhakam commissioner James Nayagam was reported as saying that the majority of the lock-ups in Malaysia were in deplorable conditions. Read more

Why infesting prison cells with vermin is clearly illegal and unconstitutional — Young Professionals

Source: The Malay Mail Online

In a report on Thursday, national news agency Bernama cited Mohd Noor calling for a revamp of the prisons to make jail cells uncomfortable places that its inmates would hate so much that they would repent and steer clear of crime forever. — TODAY file picture

In a report on Thursday, national news agency Bernama cited Mohd Noor calling for a revamp of the prisons to make jail cells uncomfortable places that its inmates would hate so much that they would repent and steer clear of crime forever. — TODAY file picture

SEPTEMBER 4 — The Young Professionals (YP) express their disgust with the suggestion by the former Court of Appeal judge, Datuk Mohd Noor Abdullah, supported by Deputy Minister for Home Affairs Datuk Nur Jazlan Mohamed, that prisons be infested with all manner of disease-bearing vermin such as mosquitoes, rats and cockroaches in order to more effectively deter crime.

While YP does agree that general conditions at prisons, lock-ups and other detention centres must not be rendered alluring or inviting in any way given their purpose and use as places for reflection, reform and rehabilitation of inmates, such places must nonetheless be maintained in accordance with applicable international standards, and the suggestion of the former judge and deputy minister that they deliberately be made unbearable for inmates is simply appalling to say the least.

Such a move, other than inhumane for obvious reasons, are clearly illegal under the law, not least the Prison Regulations 2000 made under the Prison Act 1995, Regulation 59, which requires that prisons be kept clean, and Regulation 55 requiring prisoners be treated with kindness and humanity. Regulation 20 of the 2000 Regulations even provide for any prisoner found to have any infectious or contagious disease or infested with vermin to be reported to a medical officer who shall take steps to treat the said prisoner as well as take preventive measures to contain any spread thereof to other inmates. Read more

Reform prisons system not perpetuate cruel, inhumane detention conditions — Lawyers for Liberty

Source: The Malay Mail Online

In a report on Thursday, national news agency Bernama cited Mohd Noor calling for a revamp of the prisons to make jail cells uncomfortable places that its inmates would hate so much that they would repent and steer clear of crime forever. — TODAY file picture

In a report on Thursday, national news agency Bernama cited Mohd Noor calling for a revamp of the prisons to make jail cells uncomfortable places that its inmates would hate so much that they would repent and steer clear of crime forever. — TODAY file picture

SEPTEMBER 4 — Lawyers for Liberty is deeply concerned over the recent suggestion by former Court of Appeal judge Mohd Noor Abdullah that the detention conditions in prisons be made worse, by among others making it infested with rats, cockroaches and mosquitoes as a form of deterrence.

Incredibly, Deputy Home Minister Nur Jazlan Mohamed also agreed to the judge’s inhumane and cruel suggestion that is more appropriate in medieval times than in this day and age.

The suggestion by the former judge and agreed by the deputy minister comes all the more shocking in light of the recent revelation that a total of 721 inmates have died in Malaysian prisons between 2013 and April 30, 2016 — an average of 18 deaths per month. Read more

Are you human? Group chides ex-judge, deputy minister for pests in jail idea

Source: The Malay Mail Online

In a report on Thursday, national news agency Bernama cited Mohd Noor calling for a revamp of the prisons to make jail cells uncomfortable places that its inmates would hate so much that they would repent and steer clear of crime forever. — TODAY file picture

In a report on Thursday, national news agency Bernama cited Mohd Noor calling for a revamp of the prisons to make jail cells uncomfortable places that its inmates would hate so much that they would repent and steer clear of crime forever. — TODAY file picture

KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 3 — A human rights group condemned today a recent suggestion by a retired judge to infest jail cells with pests to curb the recurrence of crime, saying it was a sadistic form of justice.

The Centre for Human Rights Research and Advocacy (CENTHRA) said the idea by former Court of Appeal judge Datuk Mohd Noor Abdullah that was supported by Deputy Home Ministerr Datuk Nur Jazlan Mohamed was barbaric, unconstitutional and possibly even criminal.

“Prisoners and inmates are first and foremost human beings and undergo incarceration chiefly as a form of rehabilitation, and not as part of a sadistic form of justice.

“It is thus clear that any deliberate infestation of jail cells with dirty and disease bearing rodents amount to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment and thus constitutes a deplorable, inhuman and barbaric interference with the aforementioned rights and possibly constitutes a crime in itself pursuant to the Penal Code and the Prevention and Control of Infectious Diseases Act 1988,” the group’s chief executive Azril Mohd Amin said in a statement. Read more