GE14 Media Watch – A Moment for Women?

Taken from Facebook

ABOUT THE EVENT
The upcoming GE14 has been remarked to be “the mother of all elections”. Yet, it has come to the attention of women’s rights activists that Malaysia still has a long way to go in amplifying the voices of women and their sociopolitical and economic interest. In this special session, Imagined Malaysia gathers prominent observers who have contributed to highlighting the discourse on women’s political representation in all forms of media.

EVENT DETAILS
Date: 28 April 2018
Time: 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Venue: Gerakbudaya, 2, Jalan Bukit 11/2, Seksyen 11, 46200 Petaling Jaya, Selangor

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Fadiah Nadwa Fikri is a tireless human rights lawyer and a leading figure in the recent Malaysia Muda movement. She was a member of the Steering Committee of Bersih 2.0, a coalition of 89 civil society organisations for free and fair elections. She was a secretariat member of SUARAM, one of the leading human rights advocacy NGOs in Malaysia that deals with detention without trial, police brutality, abuse of police powers, the protection of refugees and migrant workers, indigenous peoples’ rights and corruption.

Gayathry Venkiteswaran is a PhD candidate at the University of Nottingham Malaysia. Her research focus is on media reforms in Southeast Asia. Prior to this, she was the executive director of the Bangkok-based Southeast Asian Press Alliance, working on press freedom and access to information in the region. Before joining SEAPA, she headed a Malaysian press freedom organisation, the Centre for Independent Journalism (CIJ), worked as a journalist and taught media history and journalism in a number of private colleges and universities.

Ain Nasiehah is an Advocacy and Capacity Building Officer at EMPOWER, a women’s rights organisation. Keen on women’s political participation in Malaysia, Ain works closely with Orang Asal women and women who remain in the margins of society. She helps to create a more enabling environment for their voices to be heard and for women to fully exercise their agency. She is looking forward to seeing women from all backgrounds to reclaim their public presence and participation, and to mainstream women as leaders everywhere – not just in a few sectors.

Malaysian women politicians should not be mere ‘seat warmers’

Source: The Malaysian Insight

Picture of Fadiah Nadwa Fikri

Fadiah Nadwa Fikri says women’s representation in politics is as important as the politics they represent and practise – politics that is inclusive, progressive, radical and representative of the people in Malaysia. – The Malaysian Insight file pic, January 8, 2018.

WOMEN’S involvement in politics should never be tokenistic or treated as “seat warmers”, said activists and academics. Lawyer-activist Fadiah Nadwa Fikri said women’s representation in politics was as important as the politics they represented and practised – politics that was inclusive, progressive, radical and representative of the people in Malaysia, in particular, the marginalised.

She said this in response to a recent call by the Pakatan Harapan women’s wing for there to be more women in decision-making positions in society, especially in politics.

PH president Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail recently said the opposition pact was willing to name a woman prime minister, prior to the eventual announcement of its candidates for prime minister and deputy prime minister.

Professor Zaharom Nain of Nottingham University’s Malaysia campus, who shared Fadiah’s opinion, said: “No duly elected representative, male or female, can be a ‘seat warmer’. We want our representatives to work for us, not just for their spouses.” Read more

Dialog: Religion and Women – Oppression or Liberation?

Taken from Facebook

Feminism and religion has remained a highly contested topic in Malaysian society today. For some, discussions of women’s place in a patriarchal world may have no place in the eyes or scripture. While for others, scripture and history has always offered arguments for women’s rights in religious discourse.

In this installation of Imagined Malaysia’s dialog series, feminist scholar Dr Sharon Bong and artist/filmaker Norhayati Kaprawi come together to exchange on the dynamic role of religion in Malaysian and Southeast Asian feminist movements. Dr Sharon Bong will be presenting from the Christian perspective of feminism in the region while Norhayati Kaprawi will share her views based on her research on female religious scholars in Nusantara, as well as her experiences participating in Islamic discourses. This session will be moderated by dedicated activist and feminist, Maryam Lee.

Details of the event as below:
Date: 16th July 2017 (Sunday)
Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm
Venue: Projek Dialog, D5-8-2, Pusat Perdagangan Dana 1, Jalan PJU 1A/46, Ara Damansara.

About the speakers:
Dr Sharon A Bong is Associate Professor in Gender Studies at the School of Arts and Social Sciences, Monash University, Malaysia. She is author of The Tension Between Women’s Rights and Religions: The Case of Malaysia (2006) and former Coordinator of the Ecclesia of Women in Asia, an academic forum of Catholic women theologizing in Asia. She is also a member of the Asian Regional Committee of the Catholic Theological Ethics in the World Church.

Norhayati Kaprawi is a documentary filmmaker and women’s rights activist. She has worked at Sisters In Islam as a programme manager. Her documentaries that have sparked heated debates and used as teaching materials include: Mencari Kartika, a story about a Malaysian Muslim woman who was sentenced to whipping for drinking alcohol; Aku Siapa, which examines Malaysian Muslim women’s relationship with the hijab; and Ulama Perempuan, which documents the major roles female ulama play in Indonesian society.

About the moderator:
Maryam Lee is the programme curator of Projek Dialog, an NGO dedicated to intercultural and interreligious dialogue. She is also a writer and researcher with interests in feminism and social issues. She is currently pursuing her Masters in Development Studies at Universiti Malaya.

More Women, Better Nation: Proposing Women-Only Additional Seats

Taken from Facebook

Currently, there is an obvious gender gap in political representation. The ongoing debate on increasing the number of women representatives in our state and national legislatures was focused on changing the current First Past and Post (FPTP) to a more proportional electoral system (PR). Since the current federal government and the Elections Commission is unlikely to embark on such an electoral reform, the Penang Women’s Development Corporation (PWDC) and the Penang Institute aim to raise awareness on another possibility which may be implementable at the state level via the introduction of “Women-Only Additional Seats (WOAS)”.

WOAS is an innovative way of providing gender quota through the creation of “non-constituency seats” to be proportionally allocated after election to all parties, based on their vote shares. Through this initiative, specialized lawmakers from civil society will be provided a seat at the have the table. Such allocations also have the possibility to increase overall representation from minority groups.

In the long run, WOAS can pave the way for full-fledged switches to other electoral systems such as “Mixed Member Proportional” (MMP) in Germany and New Zealand, or the “Mixed Member Majoritarian” (MMM) in Japan, Korea and Taiwan. Both MMP and MMM also have “non-constituency seats” where gender and other quota can be easily introduced but voters will have two votes, one for their constituency representative as in our current system, and another vote for their preferred party.

Is Malaysia ready for such an electoral reform? Would WOAS reduce the gender gap in politics in Malaysia? Are such reforms constitutional? Come and join the discourse with us this 20th May (Saturday), from 10am at the University of Nottingham KL Teaching Campus.

Unsung Heroines: Handicraft workshops

UnsungHeroines-2017

The handicraft workshops led by Burmese refugees artisans from Tanma offer to the visitors the opportunity to discover the skills they use and to try their hand at crafting.

The handicrafts are on sale for charity.

—–

Unsung heroines is a charity event, built on talks, concerts, art exhibition and handicraft workshops.
Unsung heroines is a cross cultural platform to shed light on women’s achievement in Malaysia.

Unsung Heroines Seminar – The role of women in Malaysian society in 2017

UnsungHeroines-2017

The seminar including talks and debates is organised to raise the public awareness on the causes defended by Tenaganita and Tanma. A screening about the seminar’s content presents a different point of view on the talked subjects and opens new ways to think about them.

—–

Unsung heroines is a charity event, built on talks, concerts, art exhibition and handicraft workshops.
Unsung heroines is a cross cultural platform to shed light on women’s achievement in Malaysia.

Unsung heroines bazaar

UnsungHeroines-2017

The market allows local women entrepreneurs like refugees to expose their products and to develop the fair trade market and the respect of the environment. It will shed light on the skills and the handicrafts of this women fighting for their autonomy with an ethical mind.

—–

Unsung heroines is a charity event, built on talks, concerts, art exhibition and handicraft workshops.
Unsung heroines is a cross cultural platform to shed light on women’s achievement in Malaysia.

Unsung Heroines: Contemporary art exhibition

UnsungHeroines-2017

The art exhibition presents several Malaysian, Burmese and French women artists from emerging and established backgrounds. The catalog, with detailed notices and guided tours, will present the exhibition to introduce the artists and their artworks.

The artworks are on sale for charity.

—–

Unsung heroines is a charity event, built on talks, concerts, art exhibition and handicraft workshops.
Unsung heroines is a cross cultural platform to shed light on women’s achievement in Malaysia.

Women’s gains in politics stagnating, new data shows

Source: FMT News

UN Women executive director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngucka said the new data was "quite troubling" and the failure to achieve progress in women's representation in politics raised questions about democracy. Pic taken from FMT News

UN Women executive director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngucka said the new data was “quite troubling” and the failure to achieve progress in women’s representation in politics raised questions about democracy. Pic taken from FMT News

NEW YORK: The number of women wielding political power worldwide has stagnated, new data released Wednesday at the United Nations showed in findings that UN Women called troubling.

There were 17 women heads of state or government in 2016, down from 19 in 2015, while women won 22.3 of seats in all elections last year, compared with 25 percent the previous year.

“There is overall stagnation”, UN Women executive director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka told a news conference.

“These are results that are warning bells and there is the persistent missing voice of women where it matters most.”

Mlambo-Ngucka said the new data was “quite troubling” and the failure to achieve progress in women’s representation in politics raised questions about democracy. Read more

Perbincangan Awam: Penindasan Wanita di Malaysia

Taken from the Facebook page of Gerakan Pembebasan Wanita

Taken from the Facebook page of Gerakan Pembebasan Wanita

Perbincangan kedua yang bakal diadakan pada 4hb Mac nanti lebih memberi fokus kepada konteks di negara Malaysia. Antara persoalan-persoalan yang akan dibincangkan adalah perbezaan bentuk-bentuk penindasan dan faktor-faktor yang mempengaruhi tindakan tersebut.

Kemudian perbincangan akan diteruskan dengan usaha-usaha yang sedang dilaksanakan oleh beberapa pihak yang menentang segala bentuk penindasan wanita dan beberapa kritikan terhadap usaha tersebut akan diperhalusi secara objektif.

Sila sertai perbincangan kami pada hari Sabtu nanti.